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Thread: The effect of music on the brain

  1. #1 The effect of music on the brain 
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    I have always been curious if there is any effect of "good" music on the brain.
    -If so, why does the brain respond to noise in such a way?


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  3. #2  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    As a general rule, music... any music... tends to exaggerate your existing mood, or even make it better. After that... I'm not sure what you are here trying to ask.

    In another thread... exactly one week ago... almost to the hour... I posted something incredibly related:

    http://www.thescienceforum.com/viewt...=231054#231054


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  4. #3  
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    Thanks for the response.
    -but with the other portion of the question I was just wondering, on a biological stand point, why the music affects the brain.
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    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
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    Rhythm and beats. The brain naturally oscillates at specific hertz frequencies, and sometimes the music you listen to might be on the same frequency as your body.

    Might explain why when you are a relaxed tranquil person you like chilled new age music. As opposed to head bangers who often have a lot of emotional baggage and hectic lifes and as such, their minds oscillate faster.

    Just a thought.

    PS. I also find that moods and emotions often go hand in hand with the type of music you listen to. It might be worth investigating what chemcials are in the brain at the time depending on the music you are listening to, and to also see what cycles your brain is currently in, you know, Circadian, Ultradian etc.

    There is defiantely a correlation.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  6. #5  
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    I tend to be the opposite, though. When I'm in a good mood, or even just relaxed, I listen to faster pace, punky rock music, as is contrasted to slow and cheery music when I'm upset and depressed. I think the way it works isn't as easy as you would think, but more perception and personal preference than matched oscillation patterns. You never know though, it could work in some simple and easily defined way, I just don't see it happening. I think the brain is a bit more complex than that, and sound isn't really going to affect the electrical signals and chemical balances therein, solely on the type of music.

    But, to the OP's initial question, the simple fact that you can differentiate 'Good' and 'Bad' Music says that the music certainly does have an effect on the brain. And this is all assuming you solely mean the tones and harmonics of the music, and not the volume.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

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  7. #6  
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    Humans like repetition and patterns. Its inherent in our nature. There is a lot of maths in music. Symmetry, numerical patterns, fourier analysis. Thats why white noise sounds so unpleasant. why a sine wave sounds 'smoother' than a sawtooth wave. Why frequencies that have a mathematical relation sound nice and random notes sound awful. Octaves are exponential for example but that has a constant change for our perception. anyway if your interested you can read more here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_and_mathematics

    i think its all related to the way our body regulates itself, brain wave frequencies, heart rate, breathing rate. Biology likes predictable regular patterns. Even females in most mammal creatures have there fertility cycles of the same length as the lunar cycle. Coincedence? i dont think so. more light once a month, more action. :wink: The earth spins once a day, we sleep once a day.
    rhythm is evolved into us

    Im going slightly off topic. All im trying to say is cycles, and repetition is built into the system. So sounds that have mathematical relations sound nice, visuals that have mathematical predictable patterns/colours look nice and why rhythmical movements look/feel feel nice.

    all opinion of course, but there you go.[/i]
    'Aint no thing like a chicken wing'
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