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Thread: Control our dreams

  1. #1 Control our dreams 
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    What is the easiest way to become conscious that we are in a dream at night?
    Is there anything special we need to do during the day?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor Obviously's Avatar
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    I doubt you can have any control over your dreams when you reach the REM stage. So I guess your best bet is to avoid deep sleep. :P


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    Quote Originally Posted by shark17
    What is the easiest way to become conscious that we are in a dream at night?
    If I understand correctly, you want to experience a lucid dream. Our dreams are the manifest effects of psychological influences; therefore, lucid dreams manifest the effects of some influence upon our psychology. I do not advocate, as some researchers do, this kind of manipulation of our psychology for the purpose of mere experience. Dreaming is an alternate state of consciousness that opens an extraordinary window onto the mental and social influences that deeply affect our mind and emotion. Dreams offer both a common and unique opportunity to better understand the influences that significantly affect how we direct our lives. Perhaps a better query would be how can I experience the clarity of perspective lucid dreaming suggest? Focusing on this kind of query may elevate your thought processes to a level conducive to the lucid dreaming state. I hope this helps.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Since our unconscious mind usually replays subliminal data (i.e. anything of which slipped out of conscious awareness (that can even be conscious thoughts or experiences)), you may want to write on a piece of paper mid-day "I am dreaming" or "I am conscious of my dream", so when it reads the data, it realizes it's dreaming thereby awakening your conscious mind.
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  6. #5  
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    To lucid dream, you need to habituate yourself to reality checks.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chronman
    To lucid dream, you need to habituate yourself to reality checks.
    I think that means the flow of thought (dream) should have reality checks built into it. One way to ensure that is to develop thought potentials that don't easily stray from reality, say mechanics or mathematics; while living so you don't build up much subconscious potential.

    Is there any difference between lucid dreaming and thinking/imagining while asleep? When my life is going smoothly, my dreams are accessible though unremarkable and forgotten just as quickly as whatever dull cognitions I had two hours ago. :?

    Perhaps our dreams are seldom wonderful or poignant enough to warrant lucid review. Making breakfast could be more interesting.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  8. #7  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Quote Originally Posted by Chronman
    To lucid dream, you need to habituate yourself to reality checks.
    I think that means the flow of thought (dream) should have reality checks built into it. One way to ensure that is to develop thought potentials that don't easily stray from reality, say mechanics or mathematics; while living so you don't build up much subconscious potential.

    Is there any difference between lucid dreaming and thinking/imagining while asleep? When my life is going smoothly, my dreams are accessible though unremarkable and forgotten just as quickly as whatever dull cognitions I had two hours ago. :?

    Perhaps our dreams are seldom wonderful or poignant enough to warrant lucid review. Making breakfast could be more interesting.
    If we examine our memory retention from a dream, we may find that our unconscious mind assesses data that fell subliminal amidst the conscious mind throughout the day (i.e. it checks for anything that slipped from, escaped conscious capacity (e.g. detrimental affects upon emotion) or bypassed conscious awareness)). Implicating conscious notions (e.g. I am awake; I am dreaming) subjective to the conscious mind would thereby increase the potential for lucid dreaming.

    Also, could lucid dreaming be the evolution of dreaming cognition? - or is it a minor glitch that occurs where unconscious dreaming is mandatory (standard dreaming seems to stray influences to/from the conscious mind (an instance of this would be a nightmare in which negative emotions are exerted from the conscious mind; likewise, other aspects of a dream may alter a conscious pre-set, therefore altering the cognitive capacity for the conscious mind)). Ultimately, it appears to commit alterations to the underlying structure for the conscious mind.

    Lastly, could you clarify the following: "When my life is going smoothly, my dreams are accessible though unremarkable and forgotten just as quickly as whatever dull cognitions I had two hours ago."?

    Thanks!
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue_space87
    Implicating conscious notions (e.g. I am awake; I am dreaming) subjective to the conscious mind would thereby increase the potential for lucid dreaming.
    Depends on how deep the person's conscious/subconscious schism is. Some people do not sense much distinction between "I" and "it". In those cases, detachedly watching dreams is just as freaky as detachedly watching oneself while awake.


    Clarification. Most of my dreaming is just me thinking and imagining, to varying degrees of thoroughness. And, honestly, most of my thoughts and imaginings, dreaming or awake, are forgettable. The only times I get a jarring and therefore memorable dream is when some part of me is cut off, and produces something that the bulk of me would not. I take it as a cue to understand what's divided, and reintegrate it with the whole self.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  10. #9  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Quote Originally Posted by blue_space87
    Implicating conscious notions (e.g. I am awake; I am dreaming) subjective to the conscious mind would thereby increase the potential for lucid dreaming.
    Depends on how deep the person's conscious/subconscious schism is. Some people do not sense much distinction between "I" and "it". In those cases, detachedly watching dreams is just as freaky as detachedly watching oneself while awake.


    Clarification. Most of my dreaming is just me thinking and imagining, to varying degrees of thoroughness. And, honestly, most of my thoughts and imaginings, dreaming or awake, are forgettable. The only times I get a jarring and therefore memorable dream is when some part of me is cut off, and produces something that the bulk of me would not. I take it as a cue to understand what's divided, and reintegrate it with the whole self.
    Even if they receive no response initially, their unconscious mind should adjust to the notion. By logic, it should replay subliminal data and read "I am lucid dreaming" thereby awakening the conscious mind; alternatively, one could rewrite the notion to "My conscious mind is awake", or many other discrete ways.

    When I refer to the 'you', I refer to the actual sentient 'you' part, not consciousness which in my view, is an expansion of sentience with motor and higher cognitive functions; I see the 'you' as being the part of the mind that is aware, and that constitutes that notorious 'free will' debate. Also, do you not experience the vividness of a dream? (i.e. the sense of an alternative reality, exerting a myriad of emotions, comprised with auditory, visual and other sensory hallucinations)

    Also, we're never 'whole' - our basis may be consistent, but the outside should change often; i.e. the core self remains but all interpretations and potentially our cognitive functions are subject to change via both internal and external data, or a data synthesis (i.e. in my view, evolutions stops us from being static).
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  11. #10 Re: Control our dreams 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark17
    What is the easiest way to become conscious that we are in a dream at night?
    Is there anything special we need to do during the day?
    I was intrigued by dreams as a teenager and began a program of recording all the details. Once you begin the practice of trying to recall your dreams immediately upon waking then your power of recall improves dramatically.
    In parallel with this I found that I was frequently having lucid dreams. I am not clear whether the number of such dreams had increased, or whether I was simply remembering more of them. From your point of view it doesn't seem as if this would matter.
    So my advice is for you to routinely write down your dream experiences upon waking. I shall be surprised if after one month you are not experiencing and recalling three or four lucid dreams a week.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue_space87
    do you not experience the vividness of a dream?
    No, I dream in black&white only. Seriously, my dreams only include what details are relevant to the dream. For example I was dreaming about a (foolish) method of unloading container ships last night, and I sort-of "saw" the ship and containers, but I swear the containers were distinctly "different colours" but not any different colours in particular. My dreaming mind couldn't be bothered to pick the colours. Same for logos on the containers' sides: just the fact of logos, that completed the image of shipping containers.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  13. #12 Re: Control our dreams 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark17
    What is the easiest way to become conscious that we are in a dream at night?
    Is there anything special we need to do during the day?
    There's nothing supporting this. But as a fairly frequent lucid or conscious dreamer sometimes i can just tell when i'm in a dream. And when i'm not sure i do a jump test. Sounds dumb but in my experience you will always jump higher in a dream. I'm lucky tho it seems a most people don''t often know when there dreaming. It's the best. It's the matrix and your Neo .
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  14. #13  
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    When I dream, I usually realize it's a dream by analyzing the view, when I'm awake I see almost 180 degree of view, when dreaming the view is narrowed to about 100 degrees view. Also the quality of picture are of poor quality to the woken picture.
    Viewing angles, often in dreams the viewing angles are isosometric, or just some short distance away from me.

    Even though knowingly it's a dream I can't manipulate it, only watch it as a movie where fear, doubt and other feelings apply.
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