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Thread: Photographic memory (Eidetic memory)

  1. #1 Photographic memory (Eidetic memory) 
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    I know this is both plausible and possible; there is evidence suggesting for humans consisted with the ability to perceive memory in full clarity, as it were to be in reality - this ability is also slightly evident in primates; our predecessors. There are few throughout the world - or perhaps many if I'm unaware, who are capable of this; the individuals are able to recall specific data, as such; phone numbers, serials, names, dates or any other form of data through the ability to perceive memory photographically. This is also supposedly achieved through the use of various hypnotic techniques - and had apparently been achieved by Darren brown in the following video:

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFGG6zWByhM

    Amongst the many, there is also Kim Peek who had this ability from birth; Kim is able to read books within minutes as opposed to hours, and is also able to retrieve memory from decades, as such; significant and insignificant data - phone numbers, random digits, names, descriptions, etc - and drastic events.

    However, despite this, I'm wondering as to what other methods aside from hypnosis can enable for an individual to develop eidetic memory?

    My current speculations upon this for the reason as to why this is possible, suggests: everything we perceive and subjectively observe is stored within the brain, and a majority is utilized by our subconscious - during dreams, our subjective mind will use the memory to develop an internal reality for consciousness - and hidden or deep memory; memory that is unable to be retrieved by our subconscious mind, is effectively observed upon during deep hypnotic trance sessions.


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    Forum Ph.D. Darius's Avatar
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    As someone that can meditate so deep my brain begins functioning on the delta wave band, I can assure you that it's nowhere near that simplistic. In order to have eidetic memory, you have to be born with it. In theory it's possible to train your current memory to get closer to the eidetic ideal, but I have doubts as to how far that could go.

    For the sake of selling their products or services, hypnotists generally exaggerate or falsify their claims completely. I would take it with a grain of salt if someone claims to have been granted eidetic memory through hypnosis.

    Lastly, photographic and eidetic memory are different, and also very on levels of intensity. I have photographic memory, but it only works with the right side of my brain. I cannot remember text verbatim, but I can remember images with a high degree of superiority. I have largely improved my capability to recall text, but it is not eidetic even after many years of practice.


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    Forum Junior DrmDoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue_space87
    Amongst the many, there is also Kim Peek who had this ability from birth; Kim is able to read books within minutes as opposed to hours, and is also able to retrieve memory from decades, as such; significant and insignificant data - phone numbers, random digits, names, descriptions, etc - and drastic events.
    One possible explanation for Kim Peek's extraordinary mental abilities is that his brain structure is unlike a normal brain. Kim suffers from a condition known as agenesis; his brain does not have the connective structure between the right and left hemisphere called the corpus callosum. It maybe that he experiences a kind of fusion of perspective, which may give him the ability to associate sensory input in such a way as to enhance his capacity to recall obscure facts.
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    Forum Masters Degree Numsgil's Avatar
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    There are idiot savants who are able to draw photorealistic pictures at an early age because they simply draw what they see, instead of first interpreting it symbolically like normal little kids do. I think photographic memory is similar. In a "normal" mind, what we see is parsed into symbology. That's a cat instead of an abstract shape of fur. That's the letter "q" instead of an oblique circle with a straight line having off, etc.

    So people with photographic memory have managed to bypass this symbology and pass the unfiltered information directly into their memory. It would be interesting to see if there are any measurable differences in any other mental faculties for someone with photographic memory. I imagine it isn't a free gift, and that it causes a reduction in some other mental ability (my guess would be reaction time).

    This is all pulled from my ass, so take it with a grain of salt.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrmDoc
    Quote Originally Posted by blue_space87
    Amongst the many, there is also Kim Peek who had this ability from birth; Kim is able to read books within minutes as opposed to hours, and is also able to retrieve memory from decades, as such; significant and insignificant data - phone numbers, random digits, names, descriptions, etc - and drastic events.
    One possible explanation for Kim Peek's extraordinary mental abilities is that his brain structure is unlike a normal brain. Kim suffers from a condition known as agenesis; his brain does not have the connective structure between the right and left hemisphere called the corpus callosum. It maybe that he experiences a kind of fusion of perspective, which may give him the ability to associate sensory input in such a way as to enhance his capacity to recall obscure facts.
    There are others with a corpus collosum who are capable of Eidetic memory. Personally, I believe it's due to the lack of proportionally produced consciousness; our brains produce an approximate of 10% consciousness and thus, we're only able to recall to that of which is within that portion; if expanded, it may be possible that we access to more. Alternatively, 10% may represent numerous aspects from the essential language skills, memory, motor skills and other fundamental aspects to human behavior - expanding memory may not increase 10% but rather to expand the ability for consciousness to perceive unconscious memory more easily. Unconscious memory, and thus, hence it being unconscious is not accessed by the conscious mind and if the conscious mind is able to access this memory, then it may be possible for consciousness to access unconscious memory consciously. Although we're unable to access memory that is deeper to our conscious minds, we can still experience is; we can recognize names, sounds and images and other aspects alike, but are unable to access them - and sometimes are able to commit to something we once had achieved or developed unconsciously but are unable to remember the details.

    Naturally, our minds are likely to rewire the connections between each synapse throughout our neurological system; in order to develop an individual identity - their personality, the unconscious mind - or brain rather (For the aspect and thus, is not a mind due to its lack of consciousness - an autonomous system) the brain will allocate data in a specific pattern for both conscious and unconscious access - changing the pattern is consequent to a change between how both portions are able to access data; the conscious mind for instance, will interpret and access data distinctively is a group of synapses responsible for enabling for consciousness to access the alphabet is altered. However, as a result of how we're conditioned, we access data in a similar perspective but not identically; we all have distinctive music tastes, and other forms of media desires but are similar in language - we register the same data, but access it distinctively. And thus, by altering the way we access data, we alter how we perceive it.

    Despite this, I personally see it as how our conscious minds enable ourselves to access information (In one of my posts in another thread, I stated that there is a lack of definition for the component that restricts our mind from committing to certain things consciously; our conscious mind as many refer it upon, if knowing a placebo effect, will no longer pass the data unconsciously) but is restricted to a small proportion - 10% as a rough estimate, and thus, if an individual is manipulated unconsciously through varying techniques, they may be able to expand their conscious access to information. An example of our lack of access to data is how we interpret and recall the data; we view individual words in this sentence as opposed to the entire sentence. By expanding the conscious mind, the individual is likely to interpret the sentence as opposed to individual words.

    Consequent to this, and in most situations, the brain will compensate a given portion for the conscious mind to access memory more easily.

    However, this is just a mere speculation of my own and could be wrong - it's how I think of this.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Numsgil
    There are idiot savants who are able to draw photorealistic pictures at an early age because they simply draw what they see, instead of first interpreting it symbolically like normal little kids do. I think photographic memory is similar. In a "normal" mind, what we see is parsed into symbology. That's a cat instead of an abstract shape of fur. That's the letter "q" instead of an oblique circle with a straight line having off, etc.

    So people with photographic memory have managed to bypass this symbology and pass the unfiltered information directly into their memory. It would be interesting to see if there are any measurable differences in any other mental faculties for someone with photographic memory. I imagine it isn't a free gift, and that it causes a reduction in some other mental ability (my guess would be reaction time).

    This is all pulled from my ass, so take it with a grain of salt.
    I wouldn't call them idiots, but I agree with you that they probably bypass a larger proportion of our cognitive ability. An example consequent to bypassing various cognitive abilities and thus, resulting in an advantage gain in one perspective, is if one reads without reading a voice in their minds and the result is faster reading.
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    Forum Masters Degree Numsgil's Avatar
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    I don't mean savants who are idiots, I mean it as idiot savant, a compound word. Now that I think about it, it's probably not the PC term for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Numsgil
    Now that I think about it, it's probably not the PC term for it.
    I believe the currently accepted euphemism is "autistic savant."
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    Check out Jill Price, the elephant...whoops, I mean woman...that never forgets:


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SoxsMMV538U
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler
    Check out Jill Price, the elephant...whoops, I mean woman...that never forgets:


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SoxsMMV538U
    I now think the reason we lack such memory is due to the way we have evolved. We're constantly dependent upon nmemonic devices, and over the years we have seen no reason to reply on our own eidetic memory. As a result, we can only retrieve so much due to our evolution.
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  12. #11  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrmDoc
    Quote Originally Posted by blue_space87
    Amongst the many, there is also Kim Peek who had this ability from birth; Kim is able to read books within minutes as opposed to hours, and is also able to retrieve memory from decades, as such; significant and insignificant data - phone numbers, random digits, names, descriptions, etc - and drastic events.
    One possible explanation for Kim Peek's extraordinary mental abilities is that his brain structure is unlike a normal brain. Kim suffers from a condition known as agenesis; his brain does not have the connective structure between the right and left hemisphere called the corpus callosum. It maybe that he experiences a kind of fusion of perspective, which may give him the ability to associate sensory input in such a way as to enhance his capacity to recall obscure facts.
    Although he does have an agenesis of the corpus collosum, his brain is thought to have rewired all its connections between both sides of the brain through neuro plasticity.
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  13. #12  
    Forum Sophomore blue_space87's Avatar
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    Although we know this ability exists, what I'm searching for is the ways in which one can develop Eidetic memory, or simply put, total recall.
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