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Thread: What do you think about homeschooling?

  1. #1 What do you think about homeschooling? 
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    I found a link to some comments written by adults about what they though about homeschooling, and it appears most the kids hated it.

    How many parents investigate the long terms effects of home schooling before entering into it?

    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_hom..._homeschooling


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  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Hanuka's Avatar
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    I think homeschooling is the gr8ests idea evar!
    I'd give anything to be hometeached!
    Much more useful than the regular procidure of which are regular schools... :?


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  4. #3  
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    Homeschooling is often used by theist parents to further indoctrinate their children into their religion so as to keep them away from anything that might negatively influence their beliefs.

    http://www.atheistrev.com/2007/03/ho...trination.html
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  5. #4  
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    Homeschooling is, as I see it, bad. The good thing about public schools is the opportunity to meet other people with different belief, etc. Homeschooling wouldn't be far from prison. A prison from social development.

    And as (Q) pointed out, religious people (some atheists might as well, I have no idea) use this to its full potential to shield their children from different beliefs and make their kids only hang around other kids with the same belief system as they have, which is unhealthy. All it does is breed hate and make the children social, or even morally bankrupt to some extent.

    Homeschooling can be dangerous!
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  6. #5  
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    I think homeschooling is very useful to the student! (that is if it is executed properly)

    Home schooling should not be an over burden for the child.
    I believe it should be just like school but with a special focus on a particular interest. For example, I would give anything to be home schooled and learn more about maths and science while concurrently, but not as intensively, learn english, history, etc. During normal school, I sometimes feel that I am wasting time (waking on hallways, eating lunch for a freaking 35 minutes, learning slowly at other people's pace, etc).
    At least learning at home would be more comfortable (for me) and would be no strict schedules.
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  7. #6  
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    I don't think it allows for children to interact with society and feel on their own accord, their own decisions, and the ability to solve their own problems in life. Those tendencides will continue into adulthood and they will feel lost and helpless. I mean granted, they may actually get a good education, but it is not good enough to make them interactable human beings.

    PS To Q, do you have any other comments on home schooling other than that religious stuff you mentioned? Seriously is that all you think about? Talk to someone if something is bothering you.

    And yes I agree with you that hate can be gathered Obviously depending on what social groups we talk about. I mean buddhists aren't going to start hating are they because they are together? Lets be rational. But yes there are the inter group relations formed in which the bond in maintained by a common disliking of another group, and although religion can be one, do you think there may be another? Atheist's gathering? Can you imagine young atheist teenagers, gathered and away from the mass of religion in the world, and then they enter that world? It would drive them crazy. It is in essence, the exact same thing. Except now that these days whites/blacks/men/women/tall/short etc cannot insult whites/blacks/men/women/tall/short etc to come together to some extent the most popular reason in the past although I see it on XBox live a lot with Americans towards the British), and vice versa. They come up with something else, like religion to stand together. Quite honestly, I see it on this forum all the time. For instance, a religious person makes a stand, and then all the atheists jump on them and they all bond together (the atheists) and gain mutual respect from each other.

    One instance of this is Obviouslys agreement with Q right here in this thread. Q's point in all honesty was quite irrelevant, yet Obviously, a very rational, logical thinker went out the way to agree with him and not actually seeing the flaw in Q's argument. That there was no argument made by Q.

    So my conclusion is this. Home schooling is fine, as long as you as the home teacher/parent give them plenty of time to socialise and meet people. Take them to the gym, take them to do some sporting activities, etc etc. But don't let them be bottled up at home all the time. But as a personal opinion, home schooling can make one timid. Public schools can make one over zealous and private schools can make them 'snotty'. THe thing is to remember, to make them a decent human being, you, the adult have to devote youself to ensuring they feel loved and that you care for them. It is never schooling that turns a person into a horrible person, it is the parents who do not care for them.

    That is my opinion circum mid-2008.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition
    I don't think it allows for children to interact with society and feel on their own accord, their own decisions, and the ability to solve their own problems in life. Those tendencides will continue into adulthood and they will feel lost and helpless. I mean granted, they may actually get a good education, but it is not good enough to make them interactable human beings.

    PS To Q, do you have any other comments on home schooling other than that religious stuff you mentioned? Seriously is that all you think about? Talk to someone if something is bothering you.

    And yes I agree with you that hate can be gathered Obviously depending on what social groups we talk about. I mean buddhists aren't going to start hating are they because they are together? Lets be rational. But yes there are the inter group relations formed in which the bond in maintained by a common disliking of another group, and although religion can be one, do you think there may be another? Atheist's gathering? Can you imagine young atheist teenagers, gathered and away from the mass of religion in the world, and then they enter that world? It would drive them crazy. It is in essence, the exact same thing. Except now that these days whites/blacks/men/women/tall/short etc cannot insult whites/blacks/men/women/tall/short etc to come together to some extent the most popular reason in the past although I see it on XBox live a lot with Americans towards the British), and vice versa. They come up with something else, like religion to stand together. Quite honestly, I see it on this forum all the time. For instance, a religious person makes a stand, and then all the atheists jump on them and they all bond together (the atheists) and gain mutual respect from each other.

    One instance of this is Obviouslys agreement with Q right here in this thread. Q's point in all honesty was quite irrelevant, yet Obviously, a very rational, logical thinker went out the way to agree with him and not actually seeing the flaw in Q's argument. That there was no argument made by Q.

    So my conclusion is this. Home schooling is fine, as long as you as the home teacher/parent give them plenty of time to socialise and meet people. Take them to the gym, take them to do some sporting activities, etc etc. But don't let them be bottled up at home all the time. But as a personal opinion, home schooling can make one timid. Public schools can make one over zealous and private schools can make them 'snotty'. THe thing is to remember, to make them a decent human being, you, the adult have to devote youself to ensuring they feel loved and that you care for them. It is never schooling that turns a person into a horrible person, it is the parents who do not care for them.

    That is my opinion circum mid-2008.
    I can agree with a lot here, but I'll have to respond to a few points.

    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition
    I mean buddhists aren't going to start hating are they because they are together?
    People are people, buddhists too. I mentioned atheists might as well use homeschooling to serve their agenda, but so can everyone else. Everyone has their different ideas, etc. It depends on how strong their views are.

    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition
    One instance of this is Obviouslys agreement with Q right here in this thread. Q's point in all honesty was quite irrelevant, yet Obviously, a very rational, logical thinker went out the way to agree with him and not actually seeing the flaw in Q's argument. That there was no argument made by Q.
    (Q) has his way of presenting his points and arguments, often without elaboration. It doesn't mean he's always wrong or always making irrelevant points. I think he made a good point here and I elaborated that point to show its significance and to show why I think homeschooling can be bad in general.

    I also think homeschooling is fine as long as its done properly. The problem is, it's not going to be done properly.
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  9. #8  
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    I'm curious why people associate homeschooling with being locked away from society. Getting your education at home in no way means you're not exposed to society, or barred from having any friends, or anything of the sort. While its foolish to say that no-one has ever used homeschooling to indoctrinate their children, it's equally foolish to use this as an argument against homeschooling: far more children are 'indoctrinated' from private schools and academies than from being taught at home, and I've never heard outcry against sending children to private schools =)

    Historically speaking, children have been learning from their parents for far longer than they have from regulated public institutions. And lets not forget that many have voiced negative opinions of recent changes in (United States) educational law (No Child Left Behind comes to mind). Having experienced public education and felt entirely under-stimulated, I fully intend to home school my children.
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  10. #9  
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    I agree that existing public education is awful in many ways, and in that respect I can understand why parents would want to homeschool their children. There is a serious need for a lot of improvement and reform in public schools.

    Considering the educational content only, though, I would begin to doubt parents' ability to teach children beyond a certain level. Some high school classes, especially more advanced ones, really do require a certain amount of expertise in the field if you want your child taught in the best way possible.

    At the social level, however, I really doubt that simply taking your kids to the gym or to the playground or involving them in a sports team for a few hours every week can make up for the socializing a child gets in a school system. Social relationships take time to cultivate, and it takes time to learn how to cultivate them, and the exposure to large groups and varieties (at least in public schools) of people that children get in schools is much more reflective of the social reality they will encounter once their k-12 education is complete.

    I've had personal experience with several homeschooled children who were painfully incompetent socially. And it was not like they were completely isolated - at the time I'd met them, they'd participated for several years in a science club that during competitions can require large amounts of time spent with other team members. They improved, but slowly, and were always behind their peers in average social skills.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Q)
    Homeschooling is often used by theist parents to further indoctrinate their children into their religion so as to keep them away from anything that might negatively influence their beliefs.
    Do you even need to wake up to post another anti-religious, 'they are indoctrinated' diatribe?

    Tor, I know very few adults who I would trust to provide a well rounded education. As noted by others one of the functions of a traditional education is learning to interact in society. That would be difficult to replicate in a homeschool setting.
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  12. #11  
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    If I were one notch dumber I might try homeschooling my son.

    I know quite a few people raised in geographic isolation (pick about any spot in Canada) who were "distance educated". That is basically homeschooling plus a ton of materials and a few correspondence teachers who give a damn. Because the children aren't opting out they have the right to the same quality of education city kids receive, so government pays what it must and employs the latest technology. It is hard to gauge these people because... well, they grew up on one-pub islands, in the bush, etc. so they're such other creatures than the city-raised. One can't compare rustics to hive dwellers, especially socially.
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  13. #12  
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  14. #13  
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    Homeschooling is bad to a large extent.

    Firstly public schools offer many academic facilities such as the lab, the library, staff consultations, seminars and talks by professionals, etc; and non-academic facilities such as the school field, gym, physical education, co-curriculum activities, project work. Public schools provide a more holistic development of the student.

    Secondly, homeschooling alienate the child from the society. One might argue that it might not be the case as the child has private networks, but it is undeniable that it is nowhere as extensive as that in public schools. And in most cases parents tend to have a greater control over who the child interacts with.

    Thirdly homeschooling is more flexible and less demanding in terms of meeting deadline. Home-schooled children have more control over their time management and the courses are designed to fit their lifestyle. This seems to be good at first glance, but it does not provide the competitive pressure that the child would likely experience once he steps out into the workforce. Competition spurs progress. The globalised world is very competitive.

    These are what I feel homeschooling is lacking in. It is a very idealised form of education system, and does not adequately prepare the child in the future when he enter the workforce.
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Do you even need to wake up to post another anti-religious, 'they are indoctrinated' diatribe?
    So terribly sorry to have to inject reality and evidence into the argument, O. Would you prefer I told fairy tales, instead?
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  16. #15  
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    I agree to certain extents with a lot of the arguments here, but I feel that it's difficult to critique homeschooling as a whole, due primarily to the fact that the experience will differ from home to home. The same can be said of public education, to a lesser extent, but regulated public education systems tend to have definitive structure and set levels of progression. Under certain circumstances, I think homeschooling has the potential to be a much more beneficial experience than public schooling (having academic parents is a good start).

    That having been said, I think homeschooling has been given a black mark due to the sheer amount of examples where careless parents withdraw their children from public school and allow their kids to do nothing, or parents who, while perhaps more earnest in their desire to see their kids succeed, lack the persistence (or as others have brought up, the education) to keep their kid's tutelage up to par with the rest of society.

    I'm still not convinced about the social issue. I went to public school and still had horrible social skills: I could count the number of people I spoke to in school on one hand. I had far more contacts that I became acquainted with and spoke to outside of school than in it. One of the gentlemen I did associate with in school was home-schooled up until highschool, and was still one of the most socially active members of the class. If it weren't for his extroversion, I probably would have never spoken to him.

    Of course, this is only one example in a sea of cases.
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