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Thread: Einstein Experiment! Is this true?

  1. #1 Einstein Experiment! Is this true? 
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    I found this video talking about time slowing down the faster you travel. Is it possible that this video is real?

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1366485/stop_watch_this/


    I kinda think it's fake ...but I dont know.


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  3. #2  
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    Fake. At those speeds for that duration, the stop watches would differ only by about 1/200,000,000,000 of a sec. Much smaller than you could ever measure with a stop watch. (the mere act of stopping and starting the watches would vary by much more than this.)


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  4. #3  
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    I would agree, totally fake, to the point of being silly.
    Religious Fundamentalist Club - Member #1.
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  5. #4  
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    Einsteins clock slowing has been verified by space clocks circuling the Earth. Thus the faster you go, the slower the clock.
    Einstein chose the root mean square solution to space and time. It gives the correct answers. However Doppler Space Time provides slightly different answers in which the clock varies depending on the direction of travel. The root mean square of Doppler = Einstein. There is no clock paradox for Doppler Space Time.
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    yeah... this is why they synchronized ATOMIC clocks and then flew them in jets. The time dilation is still wayyy too insignificant for a regular digital stopwatch to detect.
    "It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain
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  7. #6  
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    For those who love maths,



    where t<sub>0</sub> is the duration of the car journey measured by the stopwatch in the car and t is the duration of the same journey measured by the stopwatch in the kitchen (relative to which the car was travelling at speed v). The average speed of the car was 24 metres per second (54 mph) and the speed of light is about 3×10<sup>8</sup> metres per second and t<sub>0</sub> = 1440 seconds (24 minutes). Hence (vc) ≈ 8×10<sup>−8</sup> and the difference between the two measured times is



    4.6 picoseconds!

    This is a rather simplified account which ignores the accelerations and decelerations of the car and only takes the average speed for the whole journey into account. Even if you take acceleration/decelaration into account, however, I doubt if it will make much difference.
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  8. #7  
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    Has that experiment ever been done with analog clocks? atomic clocks I think operate on the principle of atomic decay, which emits EMF, right? And EMF propagate at the speed of light, which has been measured as finite; Therefore, if your clock is moving at a speed, the emf should in theory have a further distance to travel, or a shorter distance to travel, towards the sensor which indicates an atomic decay 'tick'. By that understanding, it would appear that physical movement doesn't cause a measurable time dilation, but a measurable photon doppler effect through space...

    Please correct me if I'm wrong here, just trying to chime in with an aspect of that argument that has bugged me for years...
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    well, im pretty sure some astronauts have worn analog watches into space, but the problem is that you can't really prove anything with analog clocks since they are not nearly as accurate as an atomic clock. You would have to travel at least as fast as the voyager probes are now to notice any change, and even then you would have to prove it wasn't just mechanical failure.
    "It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by cryptonic26
    Please correct me if I'm wrong here, just trying to chime in with an aspect of that argument that has bugged me for years...
    No, atomic clocks don't have anything to do with atomic decay. Although that seems to be a strangely common misconception...

    In any case, while its conceivable (although unlikely) that some particular type of clock might not work normally at high speeds, it it would be a pretty strange coincidence if the fast-moving clock didn’t work right and the error exactly matched the change predicted by relativity.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scifor Refugee
    Quote Originally Posted by cryptonic26
    Please correct me if I'm wrong here, just trying to chime in with an aspect of that argument that has bugged me for years...
    No, atomic clocks don't have anything to do with atomic decay. Although that seems to be a strangely common misconception...

    In any case, while its conceivable (although unlikely) that some particular type of clock might not work normally at high speeds, it it would be a pretty strange coincidence if the fast-moving clock didn’t work right and the error exactly matched the change predicted by relativity.

    Great point.
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