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Thread: Our Bright Sun

  1. #1 Our Bright Sun 
    Forum Masters Degree SuperNatendo's Avatar
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    I was skimming through wikipedia again, and this caught my eye:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun

    Once regarded as a small and relatively insignificant star, the Sun is now known to be brighter than 85% of the stars in the galaxy, most of which are red dwarfs.[12]

    I had not heard of this discovery, is it true? Is the sun brighter than 85% of the stars in the solar system? That would make it very possible that if intelligent life exists on another planet in a solar system in our corner of the galaxy, the sun might be a point that draws attention!


    "It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain
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  3. #2  
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    Yes, I had read that most of the stars in the galaxy were ancient red dwarfs. They are so dim that it is difficult to do a count. The attention drawing point about the Sun or any other star is that it continuosly generates a billion times the energy that a civilization like ours would need.


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  4. #3 Re: Our Bright Sun 
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperNatendo
    I was skimming through wikipedia again, and this caught my eye:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun

    Once regarded as a small and relatively insignificant star, the Sun is now known to be brighter than 85% of the stars in the galaxy, most of which are red dwarfs.[12]

    I had not heard of this discovery, is it true? Is the sun brighter than 85% of the stars in the solar system? That would make it very possible that if intelligent life exists on another planet in a solar system in our corner of the galaxy, the sun might be a point that draws attention!
    Go out on a clear night and look at all the stars (about 6000 visible by naked eye). Almost every one of them is brighter than our Sun!. Our Sun is only naked eye visible from about a distance of 26 light years. There are only about 150 stars within that distance from Earth, and only a handful of them are visible by naked eye.

    So even though 85% of the stars are dimmer than the Earth, It is the Stars brighter than the Sun that dominate what we see in the night sky, or what anyone else would see in their night sky for the very reason that these bright stars can be seen from much greater distances than a star of our sun's luminosity.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Plus, if I were an intelligent organism that had evoloved on a the planet of a red dwarf, I would assume that no creatures could originate on planets of a sun with such a viscious output of radiation.
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  6. #5  
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    If ET is looking in this galaxy for a complex brew of elements, and not too much galactic core radiation, and a planet that does not plough through hell every 100 million years, then there are few "sweet spots". Our "Local Fluff" area beside (but not in) an arm, is one of those sweet spots.

    If ET is looking for water state changes, and weather, the Earth shows it: Watch a while - just the light of one distant point mind you - the Earth is flickering like a lighthouse. Every 24 hours, because of land masses and areas usually devoid of cloud. And ET knows how far we are from our star, that water ice, liquid, vapor are all possible. Watch a bit longer, the cycling is not entirely consistent. Because clouds are changing. Watch a year, seasonal ice may be detected - all from no more than a point of light too distant to discern features of. ET would have to conclude the Earth has fickle weather based on water phases, over a mix of oceans and landmasses.

    These are good bets IMHO, to any alien mind.
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