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Thread: Lunar Eclipse

  1. #1 Lunar Eclipse 
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    In the US, there is going to be a LE visible throughout the US and the Americas..

    It will be visible in Europe tomorrow morning.

    In The US, it will happen this evening from 10:00 PM to 10:52 PM.

    Now all we have to hope for is clear weather.

    For details, consult your astronomy magazines.

    Cosmo


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  3. #2  
    Forum Bachelors Degree Demen Tolden's Avatar
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    By 4 PM, the sun is out of sight for us Minnesotans.


    The most important thing I have learned about the internet is that it needs lot more kindness and patience.
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    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    It's going to be 3 in the morning for me (London), but if I can drag this aging carcass into the cold, and the fog/mist lifts, I will be baying at the blood-red eclipsed moon (and doing who knows what damage thereafter!)
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Demen Tolden
    By 4 PM, the sun is out of sight for us Minnesotans.
    Lunar eclipse, not solar. Times offered eastern time, so 9PM where your from and should be clear...Weather channel.
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  6. #5  
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    I have some pretty good pictures of the last one that happened here; I'll try to post them later.
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

    "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrities. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence"

    -Einstein

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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrio
    I will be baying at the blood-red eclipsed moon (and doing who knows what damage thereafter!)
    Oh yeah :P
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    Why is it that the moon turns red? Is the surface Iron Oxide?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond K
    Why is it that the moon turns red? Is the surface Iron Oxide?
    'You can credit Earth's atmosphere with providing an orangish color to the moon during an eclipse. The atmosphere acts like a filtered lens. It bends red sunlight into our planet's shadow and scatters out blue light. It's the same reason why sunrises and sunsets appear reddish. If Earth were an airless planet, its shadow would be pitch black and the eclipsed moon would be invisible.'
    http://www.astronomy.com/asy/default.aspx?c=a&id=2197
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    What causes the blackness of a shadow to turn redish though? The light being bent around the curve of earth? Thanks for the response though
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  11. #10  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond K
    What causes the blackness of a shadow to turn redish though? The light being bent around the curve of earth? Thanks for the response though
    Yes, the light being bent around the earth. Red bends less than blue (over-simplification), so our skies are blue, but the red 'escapes' (the earth acts almost like a lens) so the whitish moon, lit by reddish light refracted through the earth's atmosphere, looks reddish to us on earth, and doesn't become black/altogether lightless.
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    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    so it's got nothing to do with the cow trying to jump over the moon and missing ?
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  13. #12  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    so it's got nothing to do with the cow trying to jump over the moon and missing ?
    Not unless the dish and spoon were red enamelled...

    My own theory is, of course, that 4 or 5 times a year us werewolves get the moon to do our bidding - it is the night of blood. Nyahahahahahahahaha!
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    Forum Masters Degree bit4bit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    so it's got nothing to do with the cow trying to jump over the moon and missing ?


    I had a little gander last night (well 3am this morning) after Selene reminded me, but unfortunately, its just started clouded over here in the UK, so I couldn't see a thing. Shame. Did anyone else get a look?
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    Quote Originally Posted by bit4bit

    I had a little gander last night (well 3am this morning) after Selene reminded me, but unfortunately, its just started clouded over here in the UK, so I couldn't see a thing. Shame. Did anyone else get a look?
    Nope, same here. Friggin rain! I missed the last solar eclipse as I was in the US that time and you could perfectly see it here in Europe.
    Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.
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  16. #15  
    Forum Masters Degree bit4bit's Avatar
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    ^pfff, typical, we've had clear skies for about a week here, but the night the lunar eclipse happens it clouds over. Typical weather!

    Unlucky about the solar eclipse...I saw it from where I am, but it wasn't as good as what it would have been in the South of UK...I dunno if your from France or somewhere (?), but those in the south would have got a better look at that I hear.

    At least we got a glimpse of the ISS...I was pretty impressed by that.
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  17. #16  
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    To All:

    Here in Detroit Michigan USA, the weather was clear but it was cold.
    So I just glimpst it for a couple of minutes.

    Our atmosphere filters out the blue light. That is why we have red sunsets and gives the Moon that reddish appearance.
    The oxygen in the atmosphere scatters the blue light.
    That is also the reason why 'water' is blue.

    We had good weather here also in 1994 during the 'annular'
    eclipse of the Sun.
    Then again, in 1999(?) we had excellent weather during the appearance of the Hale-Bopp(?) comet.
    At that time, the comet Hyatake also appeared and was a naked eye object but was nowhere as imppresive as Hale-Bopp.

    But our weather in Michigan is not always that suitable for observing.

    Hey Selene, that last image you have on your posts is the mushroom, Revenels Stinkhorn. Ha ha.

    Cosmo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmo
    To All:
    Hey Selene, that last image you have on your posts is the mushroom, Revenels Stinkhorn. Ha ha.

    Cosmo
    Is it?

    Well i thought it was probably some kind of stinkhorn with its shape.

    You see, that's why i like coming on here, there's always someone
    who knows something i don't!

    Thanks Cosmo

    P.s not sure about the tomato, it looks photoshopped to me!, but the rock is awesome, i've got loads more. It's amazing how saucy nature can be
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selene
    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmo
    To All:
    Hey Selene, that last image you have on your posts is the mushroom, Revenels Stinkhorn. Ha ha.

    Cosmo
    Is it?

    Well i thought it was probably some kind of stinkhorn with its shape.

    You see, that's why i like coming on here, there's always someone
    who knows something i don't!

    Thanks Cosmo

    P.s not sure about the tomato, it looks photoshopped to me!, but the rock is awesome, i've got loads more. It's amazing how saucy nature can be
    I had an 'organic garden back when I had my own house but that is gone now.
    I have seen those tomatoes in my garden too. Testy, aren't they.
    But that is at the top. They are 'sticking' their tongues out.

    Cosmo


    '
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  20. #19  
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    We had a cold night for viewing it here in eastern Canada but it was a sight to see!
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    We were going to Edwin Warner Park in Nashville for the total lunar eclipse the night of February 20, 2008, Michael, Karen and I. A group was meeting at the Nature Center. It got cold, and snow was predicted. We decided not to go. I figured clouds would ruin the eclipse anyway.

    I held up in my apartment at Vanderbilt. Michael and Karen were in Murfreesboro. I called cousin Larry on the phone. He had forgotten about the eclipse. It was to begin at 7:43pm central time. He looked out his window and said it did not look like a full moon. I realized the eclipse was already in its penumbral stage.

    I went outside with my binoculars. There were patches of clouds, but things were looking good. The moon was in the constellation Leo between Saturn and the first magnitude star Regulus. I saw all three at once through the binoculars.

    The moon began to appear dark and dusky at the bottom on its left side. It looked like someone took a bite out of a cookie. I saw the moon's features: Tycho, Plato and the "foot with three toes." The curvature of the earth's shadow dawned on me as the moon entered the umbra. The curve was well-defined. It became clear how the ancient Greeks knew the earth is round. I also understood how less enlightened people devised weird stories. The Vikings told of a wolf chasing and catching the moon.

    The moon darkened. At first, I was not aware of any copper color. It looked as if the moon would totally disappear. I thought there may be a lot of dust in our atmosphere. The partial stage was striking with half the moon inside the umbra and half of it still outside.

    The lighted portion shrunk to a sliver on the upper right side. The partial eclipse is more eerie than the total because the darkened portion is in stark contrast to the lit portion. During totality, a copper hue washes the entire surface, taking away the drama. I anticipated the moment when the moon would be completely inside the umbra.

    A totally eclipsed moon is still visible due to our atmosphere bending light onto its surface. Our atmophere scatters light with short wavelengths. Long wavelengths like red and orange reach the moon. I imagined myself on the moon and watching the earth block out the sun. I would see a "ring of fire" around the earth, the sum total of all sunrises and sunsets.

    Totality lasted 50 minutes as the moon traveled through the umbra at 2,300 miles an hour. During totality, Saturn and Regulus brightened as did all the stars in the sky. It was hard to see them because I was in the center of Nashville. I called Michael. He and Karen were watching. He took pictures. Totality is boring. It is the going in and coming out which inspire. The action picked up again as the moon emerged on the other side of the earth's shadow. The moon began to lighten around its right bottom rim. It looked like "the old moon in the new moon's arms" as the process reversed. The moon was again one-third lit, then half-lit. I stood on my balcony. It reminded me a snowman's head with a toboggan on it. The roundness of the earth was once more obvious. I sat on a bench in the courtyard and watched the full moon emerge as if nothing had happened. The instant the eclipse was over, a cloud cover rolled in. Too late! I had witnessed one of natures's great spectacles!

    The eclipse lasted 3 hours, 26 minutes and was visible across North America. Everyone on the night side of the earth could see it.

    Lunar eclipses occur about every six months. The reason there is not one every month is because the plane of the moon's orbit is tilted 5 degrees with respect to Earth's orbit.
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