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Thread: Which are the best College Books in Astronomy?

  1. #1 Which are the best College Books in Astronomy? 
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    Can anyone please give me some bibliography from the best universities in the world teaching astronomy and cosmology? I don't want amateur books, I'm talking about Physics books, etc.

    Thank you :wink:


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  3. #2  
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    We are not ignoring you, I don't think anyone here has the answer...


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    Forum Junior SolomonGrundy's Avatar
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    if you want to cloud your mind with some fabulation about what and who we are here
    Einstein, Albert (July 11, 1923), "Fundamental Ideas and Problems of the Theory of Relativity", Nobel Lectures, Physics 1901–1921, Amsterdam: Elsevier Publishing Company, <http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1921/einstein-lecture.pdf>. Retrieved on 2007-03-25
    Einstein, Albert (1950), "On the Generalized Theory of Gravitation", Scientific American CLXXXII (4): 13–17
    Experimental Realization of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm Gedankenexperiment: A New Violation of Bell's Inequalities, A. Aspect, P. Grangier, and G. Roger, Physical Review Letters, Vol. 49, Iss. 2, pp.91-94 (1982) doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.49.91
    do you need more? bleah
    Solomon Grundy
    In 1944, this creature rose from the swamp, with tremendous strength and some dormant memories that for example allowed him to speak English, but not knowing what he was, and not remembering Cyrus Gold or his fate. Wandering throughout the swamp, he encountered two escaped criminals, killed them, and took their clothes. When they asked him his name, he simply muttered that he had been born on Monday. Reminded of an old nursery rhyme about a man born on Monday, the thugs named the creature "Solomon Grundy".
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  5. #4  
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    Thanks.

    Meanwhile I've been listening to some UCLA podcasts and I recommend them to everyone interested in academic knowledge.
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  6. #5  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    You could consider Richard Feynman's Lectures on Physics. To quote Wikipedia "This is perhaps Feynman's most accessible technical work and is considered a classic introduction to modern physics. It includes lectures on mathematics, electromagnetism, Newtonian physics, quantum physics, and even the relation of physics to other sciences."

    For current and past research in astronomy I routinely scour the SOA/ADS site. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/
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  7. #6  
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    Thanks, I think I'm going to check out those Richard Feynman's books at my local library.
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  8. #7  
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    I do feel the same way about many books. Although, I have recently read a book entitled, The Starflight Handbook, a pioneer's guide to interstellar travel by Eugene Mallove and Gregory Matloff. This read takes you through many different aspects of space, yet at the same time sprinkles in physics equations and trajectories. This is not a straight ahead physics book though, and it may not be what your particularly looking for, but I think it's a fantastic book.

    This book is probably available at your library, that's where I got mine. However I'm pretty sure this book is available on Amazon.
    Relativity, E=MC2

    Rock and Roll, E=F minor
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