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Thread: Water/Ice on other planets?

  1. #1 Water/Ice on other planets? 
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    Water and ice falls to earth from space all the time right? maybe in small quantities but its still there. So does this happen on other planets, and if so then they will have water/ice and if not than why not? Earth gained almost all its water from asteroids crashing into it that had ice in them, why didnt this happen to other planets?


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  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Mercury is too hot and small to hold on to water.

    Venus, due the greenhouse effect of the CO2 in its atmosphere, is too hot for liquid water to exist.

    Mars, it appears once had bodies of liquid water, but lost them. (just warm enough for liquid water to exist, but too small to hold on to it.)

    Jupiter and Saturn both have water in their atmosphere as well as moons with ice and possible liquid water.

    Uranus and Neptune could very well have large liquid water under their clouds.


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  4. #3  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
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    Too hot or too cold. Gliese 581 c is hypotesised to contain water on the surface much like Earth, however being only theory based on the conditions that water can exist. Who knows what pressure it is on Gliese 581c or even if the gas constant is the same. But in case of it having water, there's no crime in hoping.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  5. #4  
    Time Lord
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    This guy at Nasa has found a way to get water out of moon rocks, doing some kind of heating process on it. Not a lot, mind you, and I'm not sure I'd want to drink it.


    Solar wind has trace amounts of hydrogen in it, and most planets surfaces/atmospheres have some oxygen in them, so that too should cause water to happen.
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  6. #5  
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    all the oxygen on earth was created by the early trees and vegetation where did the oxygen in the other planets atmospheres come from then.
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  7. #6  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    Remember that oxygen is one of the most abundant elements on earth and I think on other rocky planets as well. Some of it forms part of the CO2 molecule and a lot of it is part of the rock itself, SiO2 I think. Also in H2O.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

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  8. #7  
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    hmmm good point and very well put. im off to hack my dvd player now hehe
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  9. #8  
    Time Lord
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    Quote Originally Posted by beats666
    all the oxygen on earth was created by the early trees and vegetation where did the oxygen in the other planets atmospheres come from then.
    Well, you're right in the sense that it was freed from the Carbon Dioxide by the trees. That's probably the only reason we have pure Oxygen that isn't mixed with other chemicals.

    Other planets in the solar system mostly only have oxygen that's mixed with other chemicals, so it has to get free from the other chemicals first before it can mix with Hydrogen from the solar wind to make water.
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  10. #9  
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    ahh yes its quite simple explained like that. thanks
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  11. #10  
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    sorry kojax, if the pure oxygen O mixed with hydrogen from the solar wind to form our h2o, how did other planets who have had water in the past, or have frozen water now produce their h2o? we needed trees to release oxygen as its naturally diatomic "i believe" and would need a process to release it from other sources. forgive me im learnin im learnin.
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