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Thread: Regeneration of Galaxies

  1. #1 Regeneration of Galaxies 
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    Regeneration of Galaxies

    I have developed a hypothesis about the creation of new galaxies
    in a SSU.
    Since the great majority of galaxies are spiral, I will use spirals as the renewed structure.

    Naturally, these new galaxies would be created from the gigantic intergalactic space clouds that have built up their concentrations of the hydrogen gases and accumulated scattered stray planetary bodies captured by these clouds as they entered to add more mass and increase the gravity to concentrate the gases and increase the total mass to greater levels.

    Then, we need to have a large spiral galaxy passing by at close proximity to impart motion to the internal content of the cloud.
    The isolated largest planetary bodies would then be the central objects of numerous star systems and act as the nucleuses for the formation of the stars while the smaller lighter objects would begin to move around these central planetary bodies.

    In the meantime, the gases having very little momentum, would move directly toward the central body somewhat similar to a centrifugal separator and accumulate there to create the stars.
    As the star masses increase, their gravity would also increase to increase their masses to the gigantic sizes they now have.

    The planetary bodies surrounding the stars would also condense any small debri nearby to tncrease their sizes also.

    These separate stars systems would then constitute the new galaxy

    I know this may sound like a biblical creation but there has to be a beginning for these structures. So I decided to create this one.

    Mike C


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  3. #2 Re: Regeneration of Galaxies 
    sak
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    Good idea, carry on


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    Let me get this straight. You say that a ready-made galaxy goes by a gas cloud and passes some momentum into it. The gas cloud then starts to form stars around large planetary bodies that are in the area. The rest of the cloud gathers in the middle and forms stars there. But wouldn't the passing galaxy make the gas cloud spin, therefore making it's matter move outwards... (question mark key broken)
    Pierre

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    OK, so how did the galaxy form that is supposed to pass by the gas cloud to start things going? Just curious.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by The P-manator
    Let me get this straight. You say that a ready-made galaxy goes by a gas cloud and passes some momentum into it. The gas cloud then starts to form stars around large planetary bodies that are in the area. The rest of the cloud gathers in the middle and forms stars there. But wouldn't the passing galaxy make the gas cloud spin, therefore making it's matter move outwards... (question mark key broken)
    We have to consider that the dense cloud is relatively stable anf not comtaining much motion of any sort.
    So the passing spiral galaxy causes the cloud to have some overall spin plus the internal objects are given kinetic energy as well.

    These internal motions would then result in acting like centrifuges to form star systems
    Their is a little applied physics here but you will have to admit that it is mainly speculation.

    Remember, this is in a SSU were these previous galaxies and matter always existed according to the Law of Conservation of Matter.

    Mike C

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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    OK, so how did the galaxy form that is supposed to pass by the gas cloud to start things going? Just curious.
    This is in a SSU where there is no overall beginning but only for its internal structures according to the Law of Conservation of Matter.

    Mike C
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  8. #7  
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    Got it. Do you think that normal electrostatic -, van der waal -, cohesion -, etc forces could make the dust and gas clump together by itself without the need of a passer-by galaxy? And then gravity could start having a greater role as seperate bodies grow larger?
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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    The vast majority of Galaxy are no doubt *Dwarfs*. 14 or so such galaxy are in orbit today around our MW.

    Galaxy, the best I can find out, do not simply cease to exist in the manner a star does or get eaten up by a -BH. They can be ripped apart, throwing out there stars for a couple reasons, so its said. Much of this are or become Dwarfs as well.

    Nebula or dust/gas/debris in a process of forming stars, as I understand it are not very large. Rosetta Nebula is said to be one of the larger and about 55 light years across.

    Personally, I have trouble with Close Encounters creating the spiral in Spirals or their elders the Elipticals...At anything close to a CE, the Galaxy would then be in orbit around each other for an eventual collision or joining. In this case and there are several recorded, they are expected to reform into spirals, which one is pictured a warbling spiral thought to have collided eon's in the past. However that is the current accepted theory.

    Its pretty well accepted Planets/Moons and all with all the comets/asteroids do form during a stars formation. Our system, its thought had a good many more of each during formation which has dropped to what we now have, the rest now part of the sun or thrown somehow into empty space. Its also said there is nothing orbiting our sun, from outside our SS, which was not from the original creation.

    IMO, (not a hypothosis)....and under SSU since BBT could not contain my thoughts and one of my reasons for questioning it.

    Of all the hundreds of trillions of dead star matter, over time, trillions of dwarfs formed, with lessor amounts somehow already in rotations. Whether from being thrown from a mother Galaxy or from a formation which involves great speeds via gravity to formulate a future star (s), some how create/had a spiral action to begin with, similar to our planets and suns actions, or the many twin/triple stars seen in our MW or near by galaxy.

    I see no reason why any Galaxy could not be hundreds of billion years in age, possibly trillions, even though the stars that today make up that galaxy are not, which accepts with question a 10-20 billion year limit for a stars process.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    Got it. Do you think that normal electrostatic -, van der waal -, cohesion -, etc forces could make the dust and gas clump together by itself without the need of a passer-by galaxy? And then gravity could start having a greater role as seperate bodies grow larger?
    There are large intergalactic gas clouds in intergalactic space. Those are the ones I have in mind when I think of new galaxy formations.

    Gases normally repel each other to occupy space.
    My conclusion for their containment is that 'stray' planets thrown off of spent stars or other means are the ones that contain these clouds together to form after being captured by them because of their resistance to the momentum.

    I only introduced the 'passing' galaxy to impart motion to the inner components of the cloud and also to align the contents to forming the flat spiral structure and its spin.

    Of course, gravity is the force that creates these motions and structures.
    Ideas based on basic physics.

    Mike C
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    Ok, that makes sense. So you think our universe is infinite in space and time? What is your explanation for the expansion? I don't have a favorate model myself at the moment.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    Ok, that makes sense. So you think our universe is infinite in space and time? What is your explanation for the expansion? I don't have a favorate model myself at the moment.
    Our SSU does have a limitation to its size. But this is the 'matter' universe'. I consider space to be infinite in its size and NOT expanding, but 'flat'.

    The BB concept of an 'expanding' universe was based on the Doppler Galactic redshifts that were later refuted and the EoS as a substitute.
    The Expansion of the Light Waves' has more credibility as I have explained in my other posts on the other back pages.

    Mike C
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