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Thread: the distance

  1. #1 the distance 
    sak
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    Universe is infinite in size, does a point in universe have a size infinite? Can I ask this question in some other way, that how they measure length out of nothing or from infinity? Tell me how if I’m wrong pl.


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  3. #2 Re: the distance 
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    Quote Originally Posted by sak
    Can I ask this question in some other way,
    I certainly hope so.


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  4. #3 Re: the distance 
    Forum Ph.D. Nevyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sak
    Universe is infinite in size, does a point in universe have a size infinite? Can I ask this question in some other way, that how they measure length out of nothing or from infinity? Tell me how if I’m wrong pl.
    how do you know it has infinate size? or is this just another hyperthetical?
    In case of the latter: If the size of the universe is infinite, does that mean that any point in the universe also has infinite size?
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    We measure things in the Universe based on what BEST FITS our reference of observational ability; namely, what suits our perception as a measuring rod to best measure lines and points and distances of time and space.

    That's the answer.

    If you want to go beyond that answer (and this is thanks to a theory (ss//sorry to plagiarize, but you want it promoted)), you could ask yourself the question on how relevant it would be to construct a theory of space-time based on the BEST way, the most LOGICAL way, our mind reasons space and time. You may then wish to study Medicine, establish some type of mathematical algorithm of human perception, and then try to logically construct from that algorithm how space-time is constructed, as we would ideally perceive it, as a measuring standard.
    if ever there was a time for opportunity, it is when opportunity has yet to define THIS "time"
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  6. #5  
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    Nobody knows if it has infinite size or not. It's a matter of belief almost like religion. If the Big Bang theory is true, then it's probably only so large (unless there are multiple Big Bangs out there beyond the limits of our Big Bang).
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  7. #6  
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    You are a reference.

    Don't forget your ability to observe and handle what you perceive, and how to then compare that with you local surrounds.

    What is your best fit dimension analysis, in understand what a unit is, what a fraction, and of course the greater dimension of the Universe?
    if ever there was a time for opportunity, it is when opportunity has yet to define THIS "time"
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  8. #7 Re: the distance 
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    Quote Originally Posted by sak
    Universe is infinite in size, does a point in universe have a size infinite? Can I ask this question in some other way, that how they measure length out of nothing or from infinity? Tell me how if I’m wrong pl.
    The current source of astronomical measuring is the 'parcec'.
    It is easier to understand when thransformed into 'light years'. The parsec is equal to 3.26 light years.

    The 'parsec' is the result of precise angular measurements made of objects from the opposite sides of the Earths orbit. Than by trigonometric calculations, it is transformed into distance in meters or kilometers.

    The light year is equal to the velocity of light over a period of one year or roughly 300,000,000 meters x 31557600 seconds.

    Mike C
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  9. #8 Re: the distance 
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C
    The light year is equal to the velocity of light over a period of one year or roughly 300,000,000 meters x 31557600 seconds.
    Mike, I appreciate your efforts to provide explanations to those with questions. It would be helpful if you could be accurate in your responses. A light year is a distance not a velocity
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  10. #9  
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    What about a forum entry test?
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  11. #10  
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    300,000,000 meters x 31557600 seconds.
    I think he was using the formula:
    1Lightyear = C in meters/sec * 1year(31557600 seconds)
    so 1 Lightyear = 9,467,280,000,000,000 meters
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    300,000,000 meters x 31557600 seconds.
    I think he was using the formula:
    1Lightyear = C in meters/sec * 1year(31557600 seconds)
    so 1 Lightyear = 9,467,280,000,000,000 meters
    Yes.
    Example:
    Distance to the Virgo Cluster is 16.7 megaparsecs (mega=million) or 54 million light years.

    Mike C
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  13. #12  
    sak
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxHeadroom
    What about a forum entry test?
    Off course this is a serious fun.
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  14. #13  
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    Of course, there were different 'distance' indicators used such as ' Cephied Variables, Supernova 1a's, the Redshifts of galaxies and etc.

    But the 'Parsec' is the official unit used by the astronomers as far as I can see.

    Mike C
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