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Thread: How much motion is there in a black hole's core?

  1. #1 How much motion is there in a black hole's core? 
    Time Lord
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    I know there's no way to find out. I'm just thinking down another path again. I wonder if the matter at the core of a black hole maybe jiggles around? Or would it be perfectly stationary?

    We the gravity in the center makes the repulsive force between atoms seem very small by compare. If they're able to freely pass through each other, then a particle's motion at the core would be very much like the old - object falling through a hole going through the center of the earth scenario.

    It falls until it reaches the core, then is carried upwards a little ways by its own momentum, then falls back down again, and etc.... In the core of a black hole, I'm sure its continually hitting the speed of light and dropping to zero again.

    I dont' know. Do you think that happens? Or do you figure the particles at the core eventually slow each other to a full stop?


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  3. #2  
    Time Lord
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    Maybe I should phrase this question differently....... because I'm not saying what I'm trying to get at anyway.


    If the matter in the core of a black hole moves around a lot, maybe the entire mass might wiggle around and behave like a squishy ball, flattening somewhat, then bouncing back, etc.......

    If that much mass were moving around in unison, then it would have tides and stuff like that. Maybe it's gravitational pull in any given direction oscillates slightly. Like, not oscillating between 10 and 100 billion (of whatever units you want to make up) ........ more like oscillating slightly. Between say 100 billion and 101 billion (of whatever units you want to make up) .

    My point is that even a slight oscillation is an oscillation, and when we're dealing with that much matter it would be enough to exert an impact on surrounding space/matter in that space.


    If the gravitational field oscillates, it would be like when a magnetic field oscillates. It would be possible for a net transfer of energy to occur in one direction, and then be carried off.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman Warpboy's Avatar
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    The event horizon would eliminate any ability to determine whether movement is actually occurring. For example, if you stood in the bowels of a ship that stayed constant with no oscillation of movement then you would not know which direction you are going or whether you are even moving at all. The same applies to black holes, because space and time are distorted you would have nothing to rely on that could persuade you that there is any actual movement inside the black hole, from the inside perspective or the outside perspective. The event horizon prevents all this.
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    "Mistakes are the portals of discovery." -- James Joyce
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  5. #4  
    Time Lord
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    Hmmmmm....... yup so no way to look.

    What I'm mostly wondering is... do you think it's possible that their gravitational field might oscillate?

    I was hoping it would be due to motion, the matter actually moving slightly toward and away from objects that might be in orbit around the black hole, and thus slightly changing the amount of gravity exerted on them.

    I don't know. Black hole paradoxes just kind of interest me. I figure there's got to be some way for energy to escape, because we know for sure matter isn't going to.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard icewendigo's Avatar
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    Gravity, whatever it really is, affects the outside of the event horizon, so you might be able to determine if whats left of the mass rotates. (not a physicist though, I'm just speculating)


    I read something about blackhole loosing its mass through radiation, but it made no sense to me, if someone understands let me know.

    Btw, am I the only one who finds experiments that could create a micro-black hole in a lab disturbing? (as if the universe was devoid of civilizations because all that made test x accidentally created a tiny black hole on their homeworld that engulphed the planet). Maybe we should postpone some mass acceleration experiments until we have a few autonomous colonies just to be safe?
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  7. #6 movie mass in black holes 
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    I think it was stephen hawking that came up with the possibility of black holes radiating energy because of the uncertainty principle, but I also think it has been disproven.
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  8. #7  
    Time Lord
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    I want to make a new post about this, but I've already made two, and it would kind of be spamming.

    What I'm really wondering is if there's a chance the black hole's gravitational field oscillates between strong and week. (Well, stronger and weaker, it's probably always very strong and the variation might be very small)

    If the amount of force exerted on objects outside the event horizon by the black hole's gravity varied with time, sometimes stronger, sometimes weaker, that would allow a one-way transfer of energy away from the black hole.

    Or......... maybe it could be like a quasar, where the amount of light/radio energy emitted in one direction is more than in another direction? Only in this case, I'm suggesting that maybe the gravitational pull is what's stronger and weaker, rather than the light/radio waves (which black holes don't emit anyway).
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  9. #8  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    Does'nt the matter that crosses the event horizon just continue along it original path? Then it could be that bigger than usual chunks of matter could cause a slight jiggle in the ixis of the black hole? And then the closer it gets to the centre, the less pronounced it becomes. The consentration of matter around the black hole might also cause it to migrate in relation to the surrounding matter actually helping it to faster eat the surrounding matter?
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  10. #9  
    Time Lord
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    I think this might have something to it. If one part of the matter pulling/being pulled is hitting light speed, and the other isn't, then only the part that isn't at light speed yet can be accelerated.

    That might seem to create acceleration/additional motion in one direction and not the other.
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