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Thread: Photons & the Density of Space.

  1. #1 Photons & the Density of Space. 
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    :? Since this is my first sojourn into expressing an idea in the Forum, I will keep it simple. ( I'll have to since I have no Technical Education.)
    I recall an experiment with photons, bombarding an excited atom. One photon impacting on an excited atom produced "three" photons. The next experiment I recall is that it was worked out that there is apprx. one proton in every three cubic meters of space. The third experiment I recall is when a photon is made to enter a double opening it will exist in "both" openings simultaneously, see where I'm going?
    So what happens when a stream of photons, traveling at SOL, impacts on these protons and any other particles in free space. At our sub-light speeds there would be no resistance at all, BUT at light speed the resistance of impact would be like traveling through molasses, ( No ?)
    Doesn't the incidence of matter in space have a cumulative effect on the photons? ( What happens when one photon impacts upon another ? It must happen. )
    I propose that: Photons propagate themselves and can travel in and out of our reality, ( just like those particles which can travel from A to B without having existed in between ) , and this assumption leads me to believe that stellar distances may be in question.
    So call me an ignorant old fool but at least give me some feedback.
    Thanks Slimwop


    I have trouble swallowing the present Theory of :the Big Bang, DNA, Time and Light. I'm 73 and have no formal, scientific background. Thus my arguments are philosophical and, I hope, logical. Bare with me, please.
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  3. #2 Re: Photons & the Density of Space. 
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    First, welcome to the forum. It's nice to have someone else on board who is older than me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Slimwop
    , see where I'm going?
    Not quite.
    Quote Originally Posted by Slimwop
    So what happens when a stream of photons, traveling at SOL, impacts on these protons and any other particles in free space.
    They get absorbed and, typically, re-emitted.
    Quote Originally Posted by Slimwop
    Doesn't the incidence of matter in space have a cumulative effect on the photons?
    Yes it does. Your intution in this respect is spot on. To take an analogy (that isn't to far from being a direct comparison) light get absorbed as it passes through fog, and the same thing happens as light passes through the (imperfect) vacuum of space. Remember, though, the chances of the photon hitting something, even over billions of light years, is pretty slim.
    As to photons hitting photons, I think they don't so much hit as interact as waves. [Its clear you have read somewhat on wave-particle duality.].
    Quote Originally Posted by Slimwop
    I propose that: Photons propagate themselves and can travel in and out of our reality, ( just like those particles which can travel from A to B without having existed in between ) , and this assumption leads me to believe that stellar distances may be in question.
    There is a a sort of plausible elegance to your suggestion, (It might be nice if it were true.) however I think there is no evidence for this occuring, and in science evidence is everything.

    Let me add a caveat. My schooling in physics is abyssmal. I think I've made some gross simplifications in my statements above and a better versed person than I should point out what exactly won't (or will) work in your idea.


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  4. #3  
    Time Lord
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    Well, most near stellar distances are triangulated, so it would be hard for those to be too far off. Stellar distances that are estimated using the expected color of light, or other such things might be open to some speculation.

    One thing to take into account is probability. Every now and again I'm sure a photon does hit a photon square on, but nobody's ever going to observe it because you'd have to pick through billions and billions of photons to come across just one. The needle in a haystack analogy doesn't even come close to saying how hard that would be.

    Because the impacts are so rare, they probably don't really have a measurable effect on the whole of the universe.
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