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Thread: kuiper belt no planet

  1. #1 kuiper belt no planet 
    Forum Freshman jolko's Avatar
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    Are there any theories as to what stopped the kuiper belt from clumping together into a planet.
    If it had it may have been called pluto and we would still have a nine planet system well if you include sedna then it would be a ten planet system


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    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    material spread too thinly ?


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Cat1981(England)'s Avatar
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    Perhaps it had something to do with Jupiter ?
    Eat Dolphin, save the Tuna!!!!
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    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    isn't jupiter rather far away from the kuiper belt to have much influence ?
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  6. #5  
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    Perhaps Orbital Velocities might also have something to do with it, along with as before stated, the distance between objects out there.

    Jupiter effected the Asteroid Belt between Mars and itself, but not really the Kupier Belt which is out past Neptune.
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  7. #6  
    Time Lord
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    When matter that far out *does* clump, I'm sure the net velocity of the new clump is lower (or at least different) than the separate parts that formed it were. I mean, the collision would change it's velocity.

    I imagine the new clumps fall inward toward the rest of the solar system, and eventually hit the existing planets, but who knows?
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  8. #7  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects have moderately inclined orbits, some of which are Neptune crossing, and a disproportionate number of which are in a 3:2 orbital resonance with Neptune.

    There are estimated to be around 80,000 objects of less than 100 km in diameter within the belt, which stretches from around 30 to 50 A.U. It is thought that the majority of these bodies were ejected from the region of the outer planets during their formation. Migration of the outward planets during this phase would have contributed to this process.

    It has been postulated that a stronger magentic field present in the outermost part of the accretionary disc may also have inhibited planetesimal formation.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Ph.D. Cat1981(England)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    isn't jupiter rather far away from the kuiper belt to have much influence ?
    Quote Originally Posted by musicalaviator
    Jupiter effected the Asteroid Belt between Mars and itself, but not really the Kupier Belt which is out past Neptune.
    Ahhh yes, sorry, wrong asteroid belt.

    I'm going back down to the 'trash can' where i belong........
    Eat Dolphin, save the Tuna!!!!
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    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    isn't jupiter rather far away from the kuiper belt to have much influence ?
    On the contrary, the contents of the Kuiper belt were emplaced (by and large) by ejection by Jupiter and the other giant planets from the inner part of the solar system. The same is true of the Oort cloud.
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  11. #10  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    i know that the current consensus is that at least some kuiper + oort objects have been ejected from the inner solar system, mainly under the influence of jupiter

    i was talking about jupiter not having much influence once they find themselves in the kuiper belt or beyond - imo kuiper objects probably reached more or less the size they're now in the inner solar system and haven't accrued much mass after ejection
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  12. #11  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    i know that the current consensus is that at least some kuiper + oort objects have been ejected from the inner solar system, mainly under the influence of jupiter
    My reading of the research is that it is the majority of the objects.
    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    ii was talking about jupiter not having much influence once they find themselves in the kuiper belt or beyond - imo kuiper objects probably reached more or less the size they're now in the inner solar system and haven't accrued much mass after ejection
    I agree. Neptune has the principal influence on Kuiper belts objects, which is why a substantial proportion of them - theplutinos - have a 3:2 orbital resonance with Neptune. Nevertheless it requires only a small perturbation to render some orbits unstable, and in this way Jupiter may occassionaly 'dislodge' one of these into the inner solar system, where we will observe it as a short period comet.
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