Notices
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Universe

  1. #1 Universe 
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    Have you been watching this TV series fronted by Brian Cox?

    Episode 1 told us how we owe our existence to the stars.
    Episode 2 featured interstellar planets and how they may outnumber orbiting ones.
    Episode 3 informed us that our galaxy has stars formed elsewhere.
    Episode 4 concentrated on supermassive black holes.
    Episode 5 to come.

    One fact it won't reveal.
    Our planet is only 1/320,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,00 0,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 the size of the observable universe.

    Please add to this.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5,024
    Yes , great watch.


    I appreciate the scientific popularizers but I know others have issues with them.

    There was even a public set to between Brian Cox and one of the mods over on scienceforums.net about one of his debatable statements a good few years back.


    Last edited by geordief; November 25th, 2021 at 01:03 PM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    exchemist
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,739
    I seem to be one of the few that dislikes Cox. I find him glib and rather like the scientific equivalent of a trendy vicar, trying to get dahn wiv ve kids. And he's bloody everywhere. I avoid him.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    He can be irritating. Very irritating, like these lyrics from his D-Ream days which he later retracted because they contradicted the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics which means that things can only get worse in reality.

    And things can only get better
    Can only get better now I found you
    (Things can only get, can only get)
    Things can only get better
    Can only get better now I found you and you and you.



    Even more irritating I think he's the one on the drums.

    Q: Where were the first extrasolar planets discovered?
    A: Around pulsars.




    Last edited by ox; November 26th, 2021 at 07:11 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5,024
    He has rubbed shoulders with an extremely impressive cast of characters according to this. They cannot all find him as irritating as we seem to. Maybe the problem lies with us ?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Cox_(physicist)

    I could not say how an impressive a physicist he is but I love his material and was very interested to learn that the stars are thought to have been created at the intersections of filaments of dark matter in the early universe.

    Also loved his wayback/wayforward machine around the universe. (beam me up Scotty
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    exchemist
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,739
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    He has rubbed shoulders with an extremely impressive cast of characters according to this. They cannot all find him as irritating as we seem to. Maybe the problem lies with us ?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Cox_(physicist)

    I could not say how an impressive a physicist he is but I love his material and was very interested to learn that the stars are thought to have been created at the intersections of filaments of dark matter in the early universe.

    Also loved his wayback/wayforward machine around the universe. (beam me up Scotty
    Where this stuff about filaments of dark matter come from? We don't even know what dark matter is - or even if it is matter at all?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    Cox was inspired to take up science by watching Star Wars in the 1970's rather than Star Trek I believe.
    And who wouldn't be?

    A disaster scenario like no other. Hollywood should take note:
    "If a black hole like Cygnus X-1 were to stray near the Solar System, within a light-year or so, its gravity would cause chaos. The orbits of the outer planets and comets would be significantly and possibly disastrously altered, and this would in turn threaten the orbits of the inner planets and even the Sun."

    Factoids:
    You could fit 1 million Earth's into the Sun.
    To detect dark matter at CERN the LHC would need to be 100km in diameter.
    Biggest structure we know is the Hercules Great Wall of Galaxies.

    Big Bang problems:

    There a shortfall of Lithium-7.
    The Universe's diameter expands 3 times faster than the speed of light. It should be 28 billion light years across but it's more like 90 billion.

    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Where this stuff about filaments of dark matter come from? We don't even know what dark matter is - or even if it is matter at all?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_filament
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5,024
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    He has rubbed shoulders with an extremely impressive cast of characters according to this. They cannot all find him as irritating as we seem to. Maybe the problem lies with us ?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Cox_(physicist)

    I could not say how an impressive a physicist he is but I love his material and was very interested to learn that the stars are thought to have been created at the intersections of filaments of dark matter in the early universe.

    Also loved his wayback/wayforward machine around the universe. (beam me up Scotty
    Where this stuff about filaments of dark matter come from? We don't even know what dark matter is - or even if it is matter at all?
    Assume it is just a model that works

    Actually I did ask this question elsewhere

    https://www.thenakedscientists.com/f...9131#msg659131
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Posts
    1
    Cox is such a controversive person... On the one hand, he can easily explain us difficult space facts. Also I withnessed an accident, that happened at his seminar. The room was full some ten minutes before the talk started, and there were still people arriving, so he went to the door, and said to someone “I have a reserved seat; you can have mine because I won’t be using it”, then took them to it, and for the rest of the time, he stood and chatted to people. That case deserves respect at least. But on the other hand I consider him to be one of the most irrigating pesron on British TV
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5,024
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnPi View Post
    Cox is such a controversive person... On the one hand, he can easily explain us difficult space facts. Also I withnessed an accident, that happened at his seminar. The room was full some ten minutes before the talk started, and there were still people arriving, so he went to the door, and said to someone I have a reserved seat; you can have mine because I wont be using it, then took them to it, and for the rest of the time, he stood and chatted to people. That case deserves respect at least. But on the other hand I consider him to be one of the most irrigating pesron on British TV
    Can you pinpoint what makes him irritating for you?

    Or is it perhaps the lack of a definite reason that makes it even more irritating?

    To me it feels like he finds himself irritating.He seems very " uncentred" to me.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnPi View Post
    I consider him to be one of the most irrigating pesron on British TV
    I agree, he likes to pour cold water on other peoples ideas.
    Like the idea that galaxies are formed from dark matter, and not as I was led to believe, by imperfections in the fabric of space-time.
    It could be a bit of both.

    As for the shape of the universe, we have an inwardly curving sphere (de Sitter space), a saddle of curved out space (anti de Sitter space) or a flat disc (Minkowski space).
    It could also be doughnut shaped.
    I'm going to suggest it's a double helix!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    exchemist
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,739
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    He has rubbed shoulders with an extremely impressive cast of characters according to this. They cannot all find him as irritating as we seem to. Maybe the problem lies with us ?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Cox_(physicist)

    I could not say how an impressive a physicist he is but I love his material and was very interested to learn that the stars are thought to have been created at the intersections of filaments of dark matter in the early universe.

    Also loved his wayback/wayforward machine around the universe. (beam me up Scotty
    Where this stuff about filaments of dark matter come from? We don't even know what dark matter is - or even if it is matter at all?
    Assume it is just a model that works

    Actually I did ask this question elsewhere

    https://www.thenakedscientists.com/f...9131#msg659131
    Ah I see. What he's saying is that - assuming dark matter is a real form of matter, - it would collect together under gravitation the same way as the visible matter in the universe. So the observed (and modelled) filamentary nature of galaxies would be mimicked by dark matter, invisible though it is. And because there is thought to be more dark matter than visible matter, it is the the gravitational attraction of these dense filaments of dark matter that would mainly be responsible for attracting visible matter into dense enough clumps to form stars. Yes that makes sense.

    Assuming dark matter is really a form of matter, which we don't know yet.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Assuming dark matter is really a form of matter, which we don't know yet.
    From the book We Have No Idea (2018).

    DM might have some interactions we don't know about, but we are certain its mass contributes to gravitational effects.
    It keeps clumping to form enormous halos.
    Normal matter is pulled in by its gravity and it's believed DM is responsible for galaxies forming early in the universe.
    In a universe without DM it would take billions more years for first galaxies to form.

    But we do know some things about it.
    It has mass.
    It's invisible.
    It likes to hang out with galaxies.
    Regular matter and other DM can't seem to touch it. Clouds of DM can even pass through each other.

    (It's spooky all right).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    ox
    ox is offline
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    What did you learn from the final episode?
    He went on again about inflation theory and the first trillions of a second.
    I was led to believe that the universe may have started its expansion before and then collapsed only to try again, or something.
    I still don't know why the universe bothers to exist, what switched on time, why is it mathematical, what fired up the equations, will it all expire as radiation or re-collapse.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 17
    Last Post: March 17th, 2013, 07:07 PM
  2. Riddle of the Universe Solved - Universe Evolved
    By markcgreer in forum Pseudoscience
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: March 12th, 2012, 02:18 AM
  3. Riddle of the Universe Solved - Universe Evolved
    By markcgreer in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 7th, 2012, 08:56 PM
  4. Replies: 6
    Last Post: January 18th, 2012, 06:27 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •