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Thread: Question about relativistic precession calculation method...

  1. #1 Question about relativistic precession calculation method... 
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    Is anyone familiar with this method for calculating the relativistic precession of an orbiting body?

    When simplifying by considering a circular orbit, the average orbit velocity v is:

    v = (2π a)/t,

    where π is pi, a is the semi-major axis, and t is the period of orbit.

    The precession rate n is:

    n = 2π [1 - cos(asin(v/c))],

    where c is the speed of light in vacuum.

    Converting this to arc seconds of a degree per century, the rate for Mercury is:

    " = n (360)(60)(60)(415) = 43"

    Similarily for Earth:

    " = n (360)(60)(60)(100) = 4"

    I have written a paper on this and would like to add attributions to whomever might have discovered this equation before me.

    Have you seen this method anywhere? Any help would be greatly appreciated.


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  3. #2  
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    For those using the standard method from General relativity, and are used to calculating this in radians, here is a comparible solution:

    n = 4π<sup>2</sup> [1 - cos(asin(v/c))]
    " = n (180/π)(60)(60)(415) = 43"


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  4. #3  
    Forum Professor river_rat's Avatar
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    Compare yours to this - http://www.mathpages.com/rr/s6-02/6-02.htm

    What exactly did you do, just posting a few equations helps no one really.
    As is often the case with technical subjects we are presented with an unfortunate choice: an explanation that is accurate but incomprehensible, or comprehensible but wrong.
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  5. #4  
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    Thank you for this link. I will look into it.

    I calculated for extra transverse gravitation as a result of loss of internal process and diffusion/reflection of light by the orbiting body:
    a = GM[2 - cos(asin(v/c))]

    If any path is shortened due to acceleration of the body that follows it, precession occurs at a rate of:
    n = 2π [1 - cos(asin(v/c))]

    Like the tesselation of a smooth path. The glocal curvature is the same, because the local accelerations are stronger and less frequent.

    I put some papers up at:
    http://cavekitty.com

    Unfortunately they are not acceptable by journal standards.
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  6. #5  
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    I've put up a new paper "Examining Thermal Equilibrium and Relativistic Precession" which explains the precession calculation in terms of a reduction of internal cyclical process due to velocity.

    At v = c, the body has a minimum of internal cyclical process, which results in a full increase in orbit motion at the whole-body scale.

    Physically, the internal process of the body uncurls over space, resulting in an increased displacement.
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