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Thread: Why do we gain sunlite "after the winter solstice" in the afternoon and not in the morning?

  1. #1 Why do we gain sunlite "after the winter solstice" in the afternoon and not in the morning? 
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    Is it just our way of measuring that is off? Like clocks and calendars? Thanks. Filix.


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  3. #2  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by filix View Post
    Is it just our way of measuring that is off? Like clocks and calendars? Thanks. Filix.
    There's a semi-explanation here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-30549149

    As I understand this (and not being expert I am open to correction by others), due to the progress of the Earth around its orbit, the sun is not in exactly the same place, as seen from Earth, after each revolution of the Earth on its spin axis.

    At the Winter solstice, the Earth is close to perihelion and is consequently moving faster along its orbit than at any other time of year. Since the orbital motion and the spin are in the same rotational direction, the effect as seen from Earth is that the sun has moved "further past" the Earth, by the time of each sunrise, than at any other time of year. So the sunrises tend to get later, until the effect is cancelled out by the general day-lengthening effect as we move towards the equinox.

    I'm aware this explanation may sound complicated. It's a pity I can't find a diagram. Perhaps others can do better.....


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    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Whoops... too late.... Canceling my post. Had same link as Exchemist.

    A bit off topic, maybe similar, but does anyone know the name of the effect where viewed objects (i.e. celestial bodies) appear to move back and forth as one rounds the curve?
    Last edited by zinjanthropos; January 18th, 2019 at 10:27 AM.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    ox
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    I've been noticing that even now it seems to get a bit darker in the morning. Then sometime during late February, the sun suddenly seems to get much higher in the sky.
    Exception is Ireland!
    https://www.newgrange.com/stonelight20.htm

    zin: do you mean retrograde motion?
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    zin: do you mean retrograde motion?
    Thanks....That's it. Looked it up and stole this paragraph:

    Unlike the Sun, however, the planets don't always make steady progress along the ecliptic. They usually move in the same direction as the Sun, but from time to time they seem to slow down, stop, and reverse direction! This retrograde motion was a great puzzle to ancient astronomers. Copernicus gave the correct explanation: all planets, including the Earth, move around the Sun in the same direction; retrograde motion is an illusion created when we observe other planets from the moving planet Earth.
    Sorry (its the Canadian way) filix for temporarily hijacking your thread
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    No problem for temporarily hijacking. Thanks for the response!
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