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Thread: The mass of the early universe

  1. #1 The mass of the early universe 
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    Has it been measured/estimated?

    I am referring to the time around the Big Bang.

    I understand that we cannot say what it is at our moment in time since much of the universe cannot be observed but can we run the clock back to T+10^-43 seconds and attempt a figure?


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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Has it been measured/estimated?

    I am referring to the time around the Big Bang.

    I understand that we cannot say what it is at our moment in time since much of the universe cannot be observed but can we run the clock back to T+10^-43 seconds and attempt a figure?
    Do you mean the mass of the whole universe or the observable universe?

    The former is unknown and could be infinite (there are some estimates of a lower bound). While the latter has been estimated: about 3 x 1055 g
    What is the mass of the Universe? (Intermediate) - Curious About Astronomy? Ask an Astronomer

    The problem with the second part of your question is knowing how much of that was mass of particles in the quark-gluon plasma and how much was the energy (kinetic + photons, etc). I guess one could make some sort of estimate but I'm not sure how useful it is.


    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    No I didn't mean the unobservable universe.

    It is both the mass of the observable universe and the mass of the universe as it is thought to have existed around the time of the Big Bang.

    If we can assign a number to the former ,would there be some kind of a relation to the corresponding number for the latter.

    Now I can see that the latter number will be a function of both the observable and the unobservable universe and so correlations can not be easy ,I would think.

    I am also simply interested to know whether for a subset of the universe its mass is likely to increase or decrease depending on whether we run the clock backwards or forwards -or whether mass is a conserved quantity under those conditions.
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  5. #4  
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    you want that figure in kg or pounds?
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by perdurat View Post
    you want that figure in kg or pounds?
    Slugs.
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