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Thread: Potential theory on a black hole's anomalistic features

  1. #1 Potential theory on a black hole's anomalistic features 
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    Hey there.

    I'm no advanced astronomer, but I sat down for a few hours today putting down my thoughts on how a black hole might function.
    Frankly, it's quite boring and a little bit dull. However, it does make sense to a degree within my level of knowledge.

    Bear in mind that I could be completely wrong in some instances of this theory, and please do correct me if that's the case. Although since this is theoretical science, there is no true way to prove one thing or the other unless.. well, we can prove it.
    Regardless, please do take a glance.

    In short, I believe that a black hole is simply a gigantic, dense mass that is encased by electromagnetic interference which may be the reason as to why we cannot see them properly with telescopes and (obviously) the human eye.

    The simple stuff:


    So, let's start off by saying we have a big, bright and hydrogen-filled star. This star is emitting lots of electrons, combined with hydrogen, which is the visible light that we see coming from the sun. I can conclude 2 things already. One, if the star is giving off visible light still, we're still alive (woopee), and two, it's still committed to nuclear fusion. Let's focus on that second conclusion.

    Soon enough, the star goes BIG! and RED!... and.. NON-HYDROGEN-FILLED!
    This is the near-final stage of the star before it's collapse.
    The collapse will happen when nearly all of its elements has turned into Fe (iron), and little nuclear fusion can be done.

    This collapse is extremely fast. Some sources say it happens in less than 1 second. And then... it becomes a supernova.
    Yes, there will be a big beautiful cluster of bright gases.
    Originally, I thought that the ejection of these gases (+ other things) would be too slow or too fast for the sudden (massive) increase of gravity the dead star has; and that of which would determine whether or not it would remain a neutron star or a black hole.

    I later realized, with a hint of research, that the materials spewed out come back to the gravitational pull of the dead star no matter what.
    When everything clashes back into the dead star, that is what determines if it is a neutron star or a black hole.
    There is a threshold that a lot of scientists are agreeing on when it comes to this situation. If it meets a certain mass, it turns into a black hole, if it doesn't, it becomes a neutron star.



    From here on, this is (mostly) all my personal speculation.


    Due to the massive gravitational strain a black hole has, everything is trapped, even light. This also applies for all types of rays. X-rays, Gamma rays, Ultraviolet, Radio waves... etc
    I have a feeling that these rays are causing some sort of grandiose electromagnetic interference with our telescopes/eyes.

    If this is in-fact the case, then this would also mean that a black hole is simply a super dense mass that has a huge gravitational pull that is able to bend space-time and looks as though it is invisible.
    However, this also means that there is no true... exit.
    Meaning, it doesn't function like a wormhole, and all our dreams have been crumpled by a thing called reality.




    So, to put it as simple as possible:


    - Electromagnetic interference is causing a gravitational lens to form (to better describe it, compared to being 'invisible').
    - Black holes are simply big massive objects that have a big, big influence with gravitational pull which lessens the further out you go.
    - Black holes are not wormholes.


    I hope I didn't murder the minds of actual astronomers from either stupidity and/or pure creativity.

    Please give me your opinions. I'm curious to know what you guys think!

    Thanks!


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  3. #2  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by konii View Post
    Due to the massive gravitational strain a black hole has, everything is trapped, even light. This also applies for all types of rays. X-rays, Gamma rays, Ultraviolet, Radio waves... etc
    This is correct. And this is all that is needed to explain why we can't see a black hole: because no light comes out, they are black. As well as that, they are a long way away and there is often a lot of other "stuff" (stars, gas, dust, etc) in the way.

    So I'm not sure we need your electromagnetic interference to explain why we can't see them.

    However, another problem with seeing black holes is that many of them are surrounded by clouds of gas that are bing pulled into the black hole. The heat and electromagnetic fields created as this stuff falls into the black hole can generate massive amounts of radiation (and jets of matter). So these often allow us to see where black holes are, even if we can't see the object itself.


    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Welcome to the forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by konii View Post
    Due to the massive gravitational strain a black hole has, everything is trapped, even light. This also applies for all types of rays. X-rays, Gamma rays, Ultraviolet, Radio waves... etc
    This is correct. And this is all that is needed to explain why we can't see a black hole: because no light comes out, they are black. As well as that, they are a long way away and there is often a lot of other "stuff" (stars, gas, dust, etc) in the way.

    So I'm not sure we need your electromagnetic interference to explain why we can't see them.

    However, another problem with seeing black holes is that many of them are surrounded by clouds of gas that are bing pulled into the black hole. The heat and electromagnetic fields created as this stuff falls into the black hole can generate massive amounts of radiation (and jets of matter). So these often allow us to see where black holes are, even if we can't see the object itself.
    Thanks for not chewing me out, I made this post at roughly 4am so I was not thinking about some basic astronomy-related things.
    Interesting response though.

    I still believe that they're just giant balls of mass that are somehow invisible. Beats me. ;-')
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