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Thread: Eclipse 2017

  1. #1 Eclipse 2017 
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
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    Final pack, coffee and breakfast, and then I start pedaling. About 80 miles to go camp down in the path of totality. I hear it's an absolute madhouse down in Oregon right now. Well, gotta get moving. Got a portable device I can update people with. Wish me luck!


    I was some of the mud that got to sit up and look around.
    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
    -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.-
    Cat's Cradle.
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  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    It depends on where you are in Oregon. I drove from Portland to Lincoln city this morning and had very light traffic. Much less than what I would have expected even for a normal summer weekend. I was even able to add another night to my hotel reservation at the normal rate. The hotel clerk said the it has been dead all weekend. She blamed it on all the predictions of huge crowds and traffic jams. Of course, if they report the low crowds on the news, this might change tomorrow.


    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  4. #3  
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
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    I have yet to see the hypothesized madhousery myself. I've made it to Champoeg state park where I'm gonna camp. It's not quite inside the totality. Gotta ride some early tomorrow.
    I was some of the mud that got to sit up and look around.
    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
    -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.-
    Cat's Cradle.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Question for you guys... read that an eclipse can be viewed much easier, less harmful when reflecting off water, true?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  6. #5  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Oops? Wrong thread
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  7. #6  
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
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    Right thread, dont know about water. Where leafy trees have dappled light, lots of little crescent shapes. Got a picture, try posting later. 10 minutes to totality!
    I was some of the mud that got to sit up and look around.
    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
    -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.-
    Cat's Cradle.
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  8. #7  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantEvil View Post
    Right thread, dont know about water. Where leafy trees have dappled light, lots of little crescent shapes. Got a picture, try posting later. 10 minutes to totality!
    I saw that too here in Dallas...it was pretty cool, and kinda eerie.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  9. #8  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    I had quite forgotten the event given that it would not be too exciting at this latitude and we had cloudy skies.

    Looked out the window while I was having my coffee a while ago and did notice that the light seemed a bit odd for the time of day, so that was the probable cause.

    I have seen some lovely lunar eclipses while working the graveyard shift over the years.
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  10. #9  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    In 1979 I lived in the path of totality for the solar eclipse. Unfortunately, the weather did not cooperate, and even with a friend driving me down US 30 chasing a gap in the clouds, this is the only shot or even glimpse I got of it.


    I was excited when I learned a few years ago that there would be another one this August, when the chances of good weather were higher. Totality was a bit South of where I live in Portland, OR, but I figured the drive would be worth it. There wasn't much fuss made about the '79 eclipse, so I thought it would be simply a matter of driving down the morning of and then back again. As the eclipse drew nearer, I started to notice more buzz about it. Hotels booking up etc. So last summer we decided that maybe it might be a good idea to plan ahead. Most everywhere was already booked up, but we found a hotel in Lincoln City that wasn't even taking reservations more than 50 wks ahead. We marked 50 wks before the eclipse on our calendar, and booked at midnight that day. Lincoln City was on the coast, so we were taking a bit of chance with the weather, but it was our best shot. We planned on staying the one night before the eclipse.

    A few months before the eclipse, we started to hear reports of hotels canceling or "losing" reservations and re-booking the rooms for much higher rates. One of these Hotels was even in Lincoln City. I was a little concerned that it could happen to us. About a month before the eclipse, we called the Hotel to confirm our reservations, I wasn't about to drive all the way there only to find we had no place to stay. They assured us that are room was being held, and at the original room rate. One worry down.

    We ordered eclipse glasses from American Science Surplus about 3 months ago. (Little did we know that we could have picked them up at practically any store in the weeks leading up the eclipse. But then considering the last minute recalls, I'm glad we went the route we did.)

    Then the reports and predictions of a million people coming to Oregon for the eclipse and the probability of terrible traffic jams started appearing. A few days before, this seemed to be the case as traffic jams already were forming in central OR. I bean to wonder if I would be even able to make it to Lincoln City. They recommended people should carry extra food, water, and other emergency supplies. So I loaded up the cooler with lunch meat, pop and water, packed a medical bag and brought along bread and other fixings in case we we forced to eat on the road. I even lashed the cooler in place such that my wife could easily get to its contents from the passenger seat.

    We hit the road early Sunday morning. The drive was a breeze. light traffic the whole way. We got in to town about mid morning. Killed some time, checked out some shops, had lunch at pizzeria, killed a bit more time and finally drove to the hotel( which was at the other end of town) about 1 hr before regular check-in time to find our room was ready. Eariler, upon getting into town we decided to call the hotel on the off chance that we'd be able to extend our stay. Traffic might be light today, but leaving tomorrow might be another matter. To our surprise, they had a room available, and for the same rate as our original reservation. You never can get a last minute room at the beach during the summer. (The next day we were talking to a guy who said he had got a room at the last minute for the night before the eclipse. we had to bite our tongues, when he told us how much he paid. It was some 200 dollars a night more, for what sounded like the same kind of room.) Later we walked down to the beach and had dinner at a local seafood restaurant. All in All a pretty relaxing day.

    The weather was sunny and clear when we arrived (almost exactly 24 hrs before totality), though I was eying some clouds on the horizon that seemed to by moving in. Sure enough by mid afternoon, the clouds had settled in. I knew we still had another day to go, but it dampened my mood a bit. I was feeling much better when later that evening those clouds gave way to clear skies again. We went to bed early, as we planned to get up early to get breakfast and then stake out a good viewing area.

    We woke up socked in with fog. All through breakfast, I kept looking outside to see if it was looking like it was going to break up. Where were those high winds the check-in clerk yesterday said were predicted today that would blow out this fog?

    When we finally got outside, and picked out a spot on a grassy spot next to the hotel parking lot with a clear view southwest, the Sun was still playing hide and seek in the fog, sometimes it would shine through pretty brightly, and at others it would be hidden entirely. We saw a few people walking by, apparently heading for the beach, but being at a lower altitude and closer to the water than we were, it seemed like the fog would be even thicker there. Besides, the fog seem to to be thinning and I could see blue sky in patches overhead.

    Twenty minutes to totality, And the fog hasn't thinned. If anything, the slight wind there was was blowing in more. I'm standing there with the tripod set up, looking up and wishing the clouds away, when I hear a voice behind me say "Excuse me.", It was a sanitation truck driver who had pulled into the hotel lot. "You know it isn't foggy everywhere. If you have a car, you can drive down the road, turn left at "Shuckers" (a local oyster bar) and drive up about 3/4 mile, the shy is clear, there is a bunch of people watching it up there now.
    We thanked him, grab the tripod, threw it in the car, and headed off. Sure enough a we drove up the described road, the fog began to disperse and we could see blue sky. We saw a pull out with enough space for us to park next to some others. And got set up again.
    With out having to deal with the fog, I was able to get a picture of partiality. (I didn't have a solar filter and I had to resort to holding my eclipse glasses in front of the camera. This was not easy to do and the glasses we had ordered were not the flat cardboard type, but were like regular glasses, with plastic frames and curved lenses. In order to get a photo they had to held just so, or it wouldn't work. holding them it such an exacting position while depressing the shutter button with out bumping the ear pieces was quite a feat. But I was finally able to get this passable photo.



    The fog we thought we had left behind, was threatening to creep in on us. We were all holding our breath that it would hold out for just a bit longer. The crescent of the Sun got smaller and smaller, Then it happened, totality, and the corona burst forth. I did A quick adjustment to the camera and snap off a couple of quick shots, just making sure that I got something, and then enjoyed the rest of the show. It was the shortest 1 min 55 secs of my life. Then suddenly, a spot on the edge of the black circle lit up and we briefly saw the diamond ring effect, and totality was over. I checked my camera to see what I got. Here's what I think was the best of the two



    My wife on the other hand, decided to take this photo of me taking the picture of totality.



    In the upper left, you can see the fog that threatened to drift in and obstruct our view.

    A number of people seeing me check my pictures, asked if I got anything. I said I did and showed them what I got. This was followed by a number of request for copies, as none of them got anything with their cell phones. We end up with a small collection of email addresses. My wife sent them copies earlier today.

    Traffic coming back today was heavy for a weekday, but not unusually so, and I am glad we stayed the extra night as otherwise we would have hit the traffic heading north from Salem.

    It was a successful trip overall I got the satisfaction that I missed out on over 38 years ago.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Then the reports and predictions of a million people coming to Oregon for the eclipse and the probability of terrible traffic jams started appearing. A few days before, this seemed to be the case as traffic jams already were forming in central OR. I bean to wonder if I would be even able to make it to Lincoln City. They recommended people should carry extra food, water, and other emergency supplies. So I loaded up the cooler with lunch meat, pop and water, packed a medical bag and brought along bread and other fixings in case we we forced to eat on the road. I even lashed the cooler in place such that my wife could easily get to its contents from the passenger seat.
    We took the kids and headed for the in-laws house in Pacific City, OR. We got there Thursday due to all the horror stories of the carpocalypse that Oregon would experience. But not much traffic from Portland to the coast on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. In town there were signs saying "vacancy" "last minute house rentals available!" through Sunday night.

    Monday morning was foggy so we loaded up the car and headed up to Dolph, which is a fancy name for an intersection of two roads along the Little Nestucca river. There was a turnout that was maybe 100 by 100 feet, and there were 12 cars parked there. So we parked as well and set up some chairs. The fog had cleared there, and we had an hour or so watching the eclipse approach totality.

    It hit totality for about a minute; seemed like ten seconds. The moment the last sliver of sun disappeared everything changed - it got very suddenly dark, it got colder, the birds started making a racket and the sun went from a blinding spot to a hair-fringed black hole. When the sun first reappeared it looked like someone in a helicopter was aiming a spotlight at the ground; the shadows were incredibly sharp and bright after spending a minute adapting to the dark.

    It was very much worth it, even with the hassle of two small kids and all the issues of living in a 2br 1ba house for four days with six people.
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  12. #11  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    A couple of points about the total eclipse photo I got. It turns out that the colored spots on the disk edge are caused by solar prominences (which I didn't realize until I saw a higher res picture which shows them in those positions. Also, I was able to determine that the white dot in the lower left of the image in the star Regulus.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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