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Thread: Why not have a bathing pool in space?

  1. #1 Why not have a bathing pool in space? 
    Forum Bachelors Degree CEngelbrecht's Avatar
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    It would just be spherical, wouldn't it? Would be a damn hazzle to get a lot of water up there, but astronauts could have a genuine bath during prolonged stays on the ISS. Or when going to Mars.


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    On related note, when will someone build that space elevator?


    "The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion or in politics, but it is not the path to knowledge, and there's no place for it in the endeavor of science. (History) shows us clearly that accepted and conventional ideas are often wrong, and that fundamental insights can arise from the most unexpected sources."
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  3. #2  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Why not have a bathing pool in space?
    Cost. It costs $22,000 US or 18,700 Euros to send a single liter of water to space. That'd be around 15-20 million dollars to fill a bathtub. Not too cost efficient compared to wet wipes.

    On related note, when will someone build that space elevator?
    As soon as material science can come up with materials that are strong and light enough to do the job. They don't exist yet.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
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    Plus how would you contain the water, as soon as you "went in" forces would push it into smaller spheres and start the whole mass moving
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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  5. #4  
    Forum Bachelors Degree CEngelbrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    Plus how would you contain the water, as soon as you "went in" forces would push it into smaller spheres and start the whole mass moving
    Haven't thought further than making the bathroom itself spherical, a few feet wider than the size of the spherical water mass. Can you think of anything that would continously attract the water towards the center of such a spherical module? Static electricity or something? Be stupid to have astronauts drown just to take a bath. Or give them shocks.

    "The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion or in politics, but it is not the path to knowledge, and there's no place for it in the endeavor of science. (History) shows us clearly that accepted and conventional ideas are often wrong, and that fundamental insights can arise from the most unexpected sources."
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  6. #5  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    The easiest solution would be "artificial" gravity produced by a spinning ring...as seen in countless SF tv shows and movies.

    Just curious, have you recently watched the movie "Passengers"?
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  7. #6  
    Forum Bachelors Degree CEngelbrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    The easiest solution would be "artificial" gravity produced by a spinning ring...as seen in countless SF tv shows and movies.
    Right, that's probably true. Why isn't the ISS that, BTW? It's an old idea.



    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Just curious, have you recently watched the movie "Passengers"?
    Ah. No. But it looks intriguing. Thx.

    "The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion or in politics, but it is not the path to knowledge, and there's no place for it in the endeavor of science. (History) shows us clearly that accepted and conventional ideas are often wrong, and that fundamental insights can arise from the most unexpected sources."
    - Carl Sagan, 1980


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  8. #7  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    For the ISS, again it's a matter of cost and mission objectives. One of the main objectives of the ISS is to conduct experiments in near-zero G.

    If you haven't seen "Passengers" yet, I would recommend it. It's not the greatest movie in the world, but is definitely worth a watch, and includes a scene of what can go wrong with having a swimming pool in space.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Bachelors Degree CEngelbrecht's Avatar
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    Is there anything preventing us building a spinning ISS 2 to start experimenting with artificial gravity? (Other than us warring each other all the bleeding time.)
    "The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion or in politics, but it is not the path to knowledge, and there's no place for it in the endeavor of science. (History) shows us clearly that accepted and conventional ideas are often wrong, and that fundamental insights can arise from the most unexpected sources."
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  10. #9  
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    Rather than a tub, how about something like a huge bag sealed at the neck. As for centripetal acceleration, I think a tether would work a lot better than an entire rim structure.
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  11. #10  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Rather than a tub, how about something like a huge bag sealed at the neck. As for centripetal acceleration, I think a tether would work a lot better than an entire rim structure.
    Simpsons did it!

    The Jacuzzi suit:
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  12. #11  
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    ROFL....Perfect: )
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  13. #12  
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    Many years ago I gave way too much thought & research on such ideas. The fruit:

    Huge ball of ice (sourced in space) with core liquefied by heat (photovoltaic). Fissures are self-healing and Earthlike pressure within is created by allowing crustal freeze to constrict the molten core. Within the core one of more large air bubbles are suspended, held in place with some flimsy webbing. The air bubble contains the actual constructed habitat, which rotates (in free fall) without touching the air/water interface. The interface is deliberately dirtied with available asteroid material to become soil. Surprisingly a plant & animal ecology appears possible without artificial gravity. It does require energy input (preferably light) and our Earth plants also need air circulation especially without gravity to drive convection. I reasoned that a self-contained & sustainable biosphere should include roughly the same proportions of water, air, and soil as our own on Earth. So the built human habitat itself is just a small and unnecessary addition within the biosphere, as on Earth.

    Propulsion to assemble such a biome is most cheaply done with a foil mirror vapourizing one side of an icy body. This would take a while...
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  14. #13  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    1: You don't need a rotating ring to have water stick to a surface. Surface tension of water makes it want to occupy as little surface space as possible. So it will stick to the sides mostly anyway. However slow moving droplets can become a nuisance as you do want to breathe air, and not air with droplets in it, as you splash around, so you need to wear some sort of breather mask that takes the water out of the air.

    2: You can transport water/ice to space using a cannon, have a long tube stick out of a mountain on the equator, a balloon holding the most upper edge up (about 5-10km above the peak of the mountain) and then have a setup in space to be able to pick up a ball of ice. It would take about 981 megajoule for 1 ton of ice to fire off. And it would need to be fired at 1400m/s and hope that air resistance is minimal at 20km above sealevel.

    Is it possible to have a block of ice shot from 10 km above the top of a mountain at 1400m/s? Or a bit faster to correct for drag, and angle of the shot.

    ( I assume i am firing to 120km height, and that it follows a curve of about 15% height, It would hit the spaceport at about 800m/s i believe, would that be fatal for the space station? Rather, the space station would hit the block at that speed.)
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  15. #14  
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    Water is one material we needn't haul up the gravity well. It's already in space.

    That said, a rocket whose sole payload is ice, may be a very cheap shoddy rocket built by developing countries. Much of the launch cost is ensuring precious payloads (like astronauts) don't explode on the pad. If you're pushing ice you can afford to cut corners and fail occasionally. I can think of dozens of countries that would go for this, if only to innocently develop ICBM capability.

    The OP suggested astronauts should bathe more often. Yes, good luck on that. The Mir had a shower installed, but cosmonauts neglected to use it. Apparently people in space stations become insensitive to body odors. Finally those cosmonauts were commanded to use the shower.
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  16. #15  
    Forum Bachelors Degree CEngelbrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong View Post
    The OP suggested astronauts should bathe more often. Yes, good luck on that. The Mir had a shower installed, but cosmonauts neglected to use it. Apparently people in space stations become insensitive to body odors. Finally those cosmonauts were commanded to use the shower.
    Dang. Didn't know that, either.

    "The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion or in politics, but it is not the path to knowledge, and there's no place for it in the endeavor of science. (History) shows us clearly that accepted and conventional ideas are often wrong, and that fundamental insights can arise from the most unexpected sources."
    - Carl Sagan, 1980


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