Notices
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: What would the universe look like if inflation did not occur?

  1. #1 What would the universe look like if inflation did not occur? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    19
    The arguments for inflation are based on the idea that the universe looks pretty much the same in all directions.
    My question is : How would the universe look if inflation did not occur, (leaving everything else as pretty much the same.)?
    How different would it look and in what way would it be different?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    27.4679 S, 153.0278 E
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by A_Seagull View Post
    The arguments for inflation are based on the idea that the universe looks pretty much the same in all directions.
    My question is : How would the universe look if inflation did not occur, (leaving everything else as pretty much the same.)?
    How different would it look and in what way would it be different?
    That is part of the argument referred to as as the Horizon Problem where the universe looks the same in all directions (original anisotropies are smoothed) but additional strengths of the proposal lie in its solution to:

    The Flatness Problem; and
    The Magnetic Monopole problem required by Grand Unified Theories and Superstring theories.

    Despite appearing contrived, inflation is a very powerful solution in filling the gaps associated with the Standard Cosmological Model. There is a contender referred to as the Steinhardt-Turok cyclic model which addresses these issues and it possibly still has life as a valid hypothesis if the conclusions of the BICEP2 results are invalidated. A further possible contender is Einstein-Cartan theory that addresses the flatness problem and furthermore avoids singularities.


    Last edited by Implicate Order; September 29th, 2014 at 07:11 PM.
    Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Implicate Order View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by A_Seagull View Post
    The arguments for inflation are based on the idea that the universe looks pretty much the same in all directions.
    My question is : How would the universe look if inflation did not occur, (leaving everything else as pretty much the same.)?
    How different would it look and in what way would it be different?
    That is part of the argument referred to as as the Horizon Problem where the universe looks the same in all directions (original anisotropies are smoothed) but additional strengths of the proposal lie in its solution to:

    The Flatness Problem; and
    The Magnetic Monopole problem required by Grand Unified Theories and Superstring theories.

    Despite appearing contrived, inflation is a very powerful solution in filling the gaps associated with the Standard Cosmological Model. There is a contender referred to as the Steinhardt-Turok cyclic model which addresses these issues and it possibly still has life as a valid hypothesis if the conclusions of the BICEP2 results are invalidated. A further possible contender is Einstein-Cartan theory that addresses the flatness problem and furthermore avoids singularities.
    Quite so, but it doesn't begin to answer my question!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    flattened rat 甘肃人's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Gansu
    Posts
    285
    Quote Originally Posted by A_Seagull View Post
    The arguments for inflation are based on the idea that the universe looks pretty much the same in all directions.
    My question is : How would the universe look if inflation did not occur, (leaving everything else as pretty much the same.)?
    How different would it look and in what way would it be different?
    So it would still be the primordial pinprick that is said to have existed before the inflation?

    Then it would be infinitely large or infinitely small - there would be no way of knowing as there would be nothing to compare it to.

    If you think about, that's exactly the situation as it is. Maybe this whole Big Bang, expanding universe talk (from the "outside") is three centimeters across. Equally it could be viewed as so much larger than we imagine that 100 billion light years is just a bit more than three cm.

    Taking another tact: I think your question doesn't make much sense. If you take away the distances that are the natural result of inflation, what else is there to leave 'pretty much the same' as you phrase it?
    And what does the Lord require of you but to love justice, to be merciful and to walk humbly with Him?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    27.4679 S, 153.0278 E
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by A_Seagull View Post

    Quite so, but it doesn't begin to answer my question!
    When it is said that the universe looks pretty much the same in all directions, what this means is that 'viewed at a sufficiently large scale the universe looks the same no matter where you are located within it'. The observations we are talking about here are those empirical findings that imply the validity of universal laws such as cosmological redshift-distance relation and the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) as opposed to 'visual' physical structures that can be different at various locations without necessarily violating any physical law such as concentrations of galaxy clusters.

    The distribution of thermal fluctuations in the CMBR as mapped by WMAP and COBE reflect that the distribution follows a bell curve (back body radiation) no matter which direction in the sky you look at with only faint (but necessary) anisotropies sufficient to shape the universe we see today and furthermore demonstrates that there are approximately equal numbers of hot and cold spots in the map. This alone suggests that thermal equilibrium had been obtained at this last scatterring event which therefore necessitates a reason such as inflation to justify. Other features such as the polarization of the CMBR also require a causal explanation such as inflation.

    Without inflation we would expect (as we look back in time) that universal observations at sufficient scales should demonstrate anisotropy. Inflation provides a mechanism to causally connect disparate regions of the universe and equilibrate the entire system.
    Last edited by Implicate Order; September 30th, 2014 at 02:26 AM.
    Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: March 31st, 2014, 05:56 PM
  2. What does not occur by chance?
    By human1 in forum Behavior and Psychology
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 1st, 2010, 10:06 PM
  3. How did Consciousness first occur?
    By Tony John C in forum Behavior and Psychology
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 8th, 2007, 02:29 PM
  4. will this type of reaction occur?
    By Onyx in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: February 23rd, 2007, 12:36 AM
  5. Inflation of the universe & the expansion of space.
    By leohopkins in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: January 22nd, 2007, 11:23 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •