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Thread: Could you freeze the sun?

  1. #1 Could you freeze the sun? 
    New Member Ginseng's Avatar
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    Hi, I've been reading too many sci fi books lately and its has made me start thinking.
    In theory could you freeze the entire sun solid? Of course humanity is beyond imagining quite a feat but with some unknown technology, could you?
    My Knowledge is more in quantum physics and theoretical physics so sorry if the question sounds stupid or dumb X), but i would honestly really like to know.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    How cold is it in space? That question is sure to prompt the geeks among us to pipe up with “2.7K”. For 2.7 Kelvin, or 2.7 degrees above absolute zero

    So how can you freeze the sun when it is surrounded by almost absolute zero temperature?


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginseng View Post
    Hi, I've been reading too many sci fi books lately and its has made me start thinking. In theory could you freeze the entire sun solid? Of course humanity is beyond imagining quite a feat but with some unknown technology, could you?
    To make it "solid?" No. You can indeed freeze hydrogen (which is the primary constituent of the sun) but you have a few problems:

    1) Under high pressures, of the sort you would get in the center of the Sun, it would convert to metallic hydrogen, a liquid.
    2) You would most likely see a restart in fusion due to spontaneous events like meteor impacts. You would only need a very transient rise in temperature to restart fusion, which would rapidly spread throughout the now-dense star.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
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    Do you mean freezing the hydrogen fusion reaction that is what our sun is?
    If that is the case it is like asking if you could freeze a fire.
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    Would you have better luck with a pulsar?
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  7. #6  
    Forum Bachelors Degree GoldenRatio's Avatar
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    Freeze the sun? No.

    Extinguish the sun/destroy the sun? Maybe, if you had a machine that could turn off nuclear fusion or gravity.

    A weapon composed of a Trilithium warhead should suffice. I would suggest speaking to Soran for help.

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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenRatio View Post
    I would suggest speaking to Soran for help.
    " They say time is the fire in which we burn. Right now, Captain, my time is running out. We leave so many things unfinished in our lives. "
    ~ Tolian Soran
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  9. #8  
    Forum Professor astromark's Avatar
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    ~ A understanding of what the Sun is soon brings me to conclude that; Yes the Sun could be frozen.. by simply defusing it's mass..
    'If we could lessen or cancel the gravity force that drives the hydrogen to helium reaction it would begin to cool..' Blow it to bits.
    That given time the sun, now spread out across a massive area could be said to be frozen.. just gas and globules of whatever the component frozen bits are.. and then with a elapsed time period could it all be drawn together again as a bright new star to be born.. Yes. What was the question ? The point I am aiming to clear is that it's the gravity mass the is the heat source.. all you need to do is spread it thin and wide and yes it would be frozen.. but..
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by astromark View Post
    n.. Yes. What was the question ? The point I am aiming to clear is that it's the gravity mass the is the heat source.. all you need to do is spread it thin and wide and yes it would be frozen.. but..

    ... but blasting a chicken with enough force in a thermonuclear explosion ithat it becomes a widely distributed atomic plasma is not the same thing as freezing a chicken....
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  11. #10  
    Forum Professor astromark's Avatar
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    But that given a few 'BILLION' years.. frozen, it would become.. I did not say this would happen in any time frame of use to us. did I ?
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  12. #11  
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    What exactly do you mean by "freeze" ? like in terms of it just suddenly becomes a huge chunk of frozen Hydrogen and He-3 mixed with the occasional heavier element? As in it would, for the most part, retain it's former structural form? Like you do not change it's former chemical makeup?
    I mean, since Hydrogen is it's most prominent ingredient and assuming you don't want to change it's form all too much (we're talking ~1,5mil km diameter sized frozen baseball) I'd say it's impossibe, because no matter what means you apply to cool it down the forces in it's center would just restart the fusion reaction due to it's immense gravitational forces even if you managed to accomplish it in the first place, which I couldn't figure out how to do for the life of me.
    On the other hand if you somehow managed to pull the entire thing apart somehow so that you would simply speaking increase it's radius more and more to the point at which it falls a good part below critical density, mixed some (insane amount of) oxygen into the whole thing, so you'd have a goddamn huge spherical-space-water-pool and let the cold, unforgiving conditions of space do the rest, you just might manage to make yourself the mother of all- behemoth like-doomsday comets and think of a new name for a new type of celestial body.
    By the way I'd go with Beheziziathan.
    Last edited by Etsin; September 12th, 2014 at 08:44 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    How cold is it in space? That question is sure to prompt the geeks among us to pipe up with “2.7K”. For 2.7 Kelvin, or 2.7 degrees above absolute zero

    So how can you freeze the sun when it is surrounded by almost absolute zero temperature?
    Huh?
    Space has no temperature.
    2.7K is background radiation if nothing is closer.
    But still, huh?
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  14. #13  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G O R T View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    How cold is it in space? That question is sure to prompt the geeks among us to pipe up with “2.7K”. For 2.7 Kelvin, or 2.7 degrees above absolute zero

    So how can you freeze the sun when it is surrounded by almost absolute zero temperature?
    Huh?
    Space has no temperature.
    2.7K is background radiation if nothing is closer.
    But still, huh?
    Astronauts can experience vast differences in temperature between the side facing the Sun, and the side in shadow. Their spacesuits compensate for this using heaters and cooling systems.

    Let’s talk a little further out. As you travel away from the Sun, the temperature of an object in space plummets.

    The surface temperature of Pluto can get as low as -240 Celsius, just 33 degrees above absolute zero.

    Clouds of gas and dust between the stars within our galaxy are only 10 to 20 degrees above absolute zero.

    And if you travel out far away from everything in the Universe, you can never get lower than a minimum of just 2.7 Kelvin or -270.45 Celsius.

    This is the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which permeates the entire Universe.

    In space? It’s as cold as it can get.


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  15. #14  
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    Lovely, and yet space has no temperature. Only matter has temperature.
    Matter can be hot or cold in space depending upon radiative balance. Space is not cold. Nomenclature, you know.

    Thus the huh?
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  16. #15  
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    The only possible way to do this is to let it happen naturally, by virtue of the sun running out of fuel and cooling down over time, but that would take longer than the known history of the unvierse. What you're looking for is a "black dwarf," but the known universe has not existed long enough for there to be any of these. It would take trillions of years. But it's theoretically possible for you to witness that, if you were to accelerate at 1 G and eventually reach something like 99.999999% of the speed of light, the universe would rapidly age around you, with billions and billions of years flying by, while (from your own spective) you lived out your normal lifespan. All a consequence of Einsteinian time dilation.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginseng View Post
    Hi, I've been reading too many sci fi books lately and its has made me start thinking.
    In theory could you freeze the entire sun solid? Of course humanity is beyond imagining quite a feat but with some unknown technology, could you?
    My Knowledge is more in quantum physics and theoretical physics so sorry if the question sounds stupid or dumb X), but i would honestly really like to know.
    That determines what you mean by Freeze the sun. Theoretically it's possible to freeze the sun depending on you mean by freeze.
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  18. #17  
    flattened rat 甘肃人's Avatar
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    Could I freeze the sun? Sure, I could. Just don't feel like it.
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