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Thread: Layers to astroids

  1. #1 Layers to astroids 
    Forum Senior chero's Avatar
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    Is there evidence to asteroids or even comets having various "layers" under their surface which may pocket warmth or other "environments" during passage through space?

    one link that carries such possibility:
    Battered asteroid may have warm core | MIT News Office


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    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
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    Now an international team of researchers from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United States has analyzed Lutetia’s surface images, and found that underneath its cold and cracked exterior, the asteroid may in fact have once harbored a molten-hot, metallic core. The findings suggest that Lutetia, despite billions of years of impacts, may have retained its original structure — a preserved remnant of the very earliest days of the solar system.
    This is talking about past conditions.


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    Forum Senior chero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexG View Post
    Now an international team of researchers from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United States has analyzed Lutetia’s surface images, and found that underneath its cold and cracked exterior, the asteroid may in fact have once harbored a molten-hot, metallic core. The findings suggest that Lutetia, despite billions of years of impacts, may have retained its original structure — a preserved remnant of the very earliest days of the solar system.
    This is talking about past conditions.
    Okay, but may there be conditions in which warmth may still be present?
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    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
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    The article does not appear to imply such.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
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    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
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    I thought this was relevant:

    A team of researchers led by Soko Matsumura of Dundee University in Scotland has found evidence that appears to explain the inordinately large numbers of big boulders found on the surface of asteroids. In their paper uploaded to the preprint server arXiv, the team describes lab experiments they conducted that show the Brazil-nut effect is likely responsible for the seemingly odd phenomenon.
    Abstract
    Out of the handful of asteroids that have been imaged, some have distributions of blocks that are not easily explained. In this paper, we investigate the possibility that seismic shaking leads to the size sorting of particles in asteroids. In particular, we focus on the so-called Brazil Nut Effect (BNE) that separates large particles from small ones under vibrations.
    Experiments show disproportionately large number of big boulders on asteroids likely due to Brazil-nut effect
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    Forum Freshman jjmckane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chero View Post

    Okay, but may there be conditions in which warmth may still be present?
    Sure, if in a situation like the moons of some gas giants. There the interior heating is caused by tidal and/or radiation belts, IIRC. The most likely situation in the interior solar system is possibly very different, like Shoemaker-Levy encounter with a planet and then escape with multiple portions which are so close to reattach with enough friction to heat up the core for a long while on a residual low level. (Only about 25% of impact is spent at impact location, much of the rest spread through out the larger body in the form of shock waves which are then turned into heat. To not be blasted off in the low G and the light dV of surrounding cloud of material, the effect will still be relatively small.)

    Another possibility is a batch of radioactive materials. This is more of a problem, since the model I have normally seen for early concentration is by weight settling concentration via specific gravity in larger worlds such as the Earth. Even Mars sized worlds had problems sorting out, meaning there was not enough heat, thus Mars is heavy on the crust/lighter in core than the Earth ratio. And there would have to be a direct collision of two Mars sized worlds, not like the glancing blow one that the Earth had to spin out our Moon. This could have made a batch of highly radioactive material flying around in the solar plane til our present time, quite hot even in a small asteroid since rock is a good insulator.

    There has on Earth been a ore that reached critical mass near the surface a couple of billion years ago in what is now Oklo, Gabon:

    Nature’s Nuclear Reactors: The 2-Billion-Year-Old Natural Fission Reactors in Gabon, Western Africa | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network
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