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Thread: The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

  1. #1 The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared 
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared
    Credit: R. Kennicutt (Steward Obs.) et al., SSC, JPL, Caltech, NASA

    This floating ring is the size of a galaxy. In fact, it is part of the photogenic Sombrero Galaxy, one of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope, superposed in false-color on an existing image taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in optical light. The Sombrero Galaxy, also known as M104, spans about 50,000 light years across and lies 28 million light years away. M104 can be seen with a small telescope in the direction of the constellation of Virgo.

    Source here
    In my opinion and much of the publics, the photos that the Hubble has produced are unmatched in quality, bringing to life the far flung cosmos.


    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  3. #2  
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    Awesome pic. "Photogenic galaxy" indeed.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Of course, you did read that the infrared image was taken by the Spitzer Space Telescope and combined with a false color image from the Hubble? Right?

    Anyway. A couple of other pics of the Sombrero Galaxy courtesy of Apod. One from Hubble. The other from the VLT in Chile.


    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap031008.html


    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000228.html
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  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    Yes, lots of the photos are becoming composites. The clarity of Hubble is hard to beat in the visable spectrum. By combining it with other images such as IR, you get a different image that still gives a shot you recognise while emphisizing other properties.

    Thanks for the shots, those are fantastic. I suspect the Spitzer Space Telescope will wind up being the replacement for Hubble after it reaches the end of its useful life and is deorbited.
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
    - H. G. Wells (1866-1946)
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