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Thread: Voyager

  1. #1 Voyager 
    Forum Bachelors Degree One beer's Avatar
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    Hats off to Voyager, which apparently left our solar system last August. 12 billion miles: Way to go!

    Fantastic.

    OB


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  3. #2  
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    are we there yet?

    i think the electronics lasting so long and in such an environment truly amazing.


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  4. #3  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Just waiting for V'ger to return.
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    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Crop Circles?
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  6. #5  
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    Hasn't Voyager already left the solar system several times? Its been in space 36 years, the accepted definition of "edge of the solar system" keeps changing.
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  7. #6  
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    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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    Isn't the Oort Cloud part of the Solar System? It seems as if the definition of "left the Solar system" being used is bit iffy. Or debateable. Hope I'm not being too much of a Buzz Killington.
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    pretty awesome!
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  10. #9  
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    So now the question is - will we catch up with it eventually ? Will we one day be able to retrieve the spacecraft we ourselves sent out, for a triumphant return to earth ( that would make some monument !! ) ? Or will someone / something else get to it first ?

    In either case, I hope no one forgot his dirty socks inside...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    So now the question is - will we catch up with it eventually ? Will we one day be able to retrieve the spacecraft we ourselves sent out, for a triumphant return to earth ( that would make some monument !! ) ? Or will someone / something else get to it first ?

    In either case, I hope no one forgot his dirty socks inside...
    It's the jock strap I am concerned with....the dirty socks are a moot point!
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwirko View Post
    Isn't the Oort Cloud part of the Solar System? It seems as if the definition of "left the Solar system" being used is bit iffy. Or debateable. Hope I'm not being too much of a Buzz Killington.
    That's because they have never been sure exactly how to define it or how to measure it with Voyager 1's limited set of instruments. It is only now that they have concluded that the direct impact of the sun stopped last August.

    More here: Voyager 1 Has Left Solar System, Enters Interstellar Space | Space.com

    Exciting!
    Last edited by KALSTER; September 22nd, 2013 at 06:09 AM.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    So now the question is - will we catch up with it eventually ? Will we one day be able to retrieve the spacecraft we ourselves sent out, for a triumphant return to earth ( that would make some monument !! ) ? Or will someone / something else get to it first ?

    The former possibility can lead to the statement that Voyager 1 is a time capsule for our descendants, rather than a device for communication with intelligent alien species.
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    The former possibility can lead to the statement that Voyager 1 is a time capsule for our descendants, rather than a device for communication with intelligent alien species.
    It is far, far, far, far more likely that the "time capsule for our descendants" would apply, should we have descendents that make it out there to catch up with it and have an interest to do so...

    But Voyager 1 can act as a device for communication with an alien species, if that remote possibility: Voyager - The Interstellar Mission
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    The former possibility can lead to the statement that Voyager 1 is a time capsule for our descendants, rather than a device for communication with intelligent alien species.
    It is far, far, far, far more likely that the "time capsule for our descendants" would apply, should we have descendents that make it out there to catch up with it and have an interest to do so...

    But Voyager 1 can act as a device for communication with an alien species, if that remote possibility: Voyager - The Interstellar Mission

    I am also curious about how we are going to track Voyager 1 in e.g. 100 years from now.
    Are its signals not become weaker due to the vastly increasing distance?
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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  16. #15  
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    Trajectory.

    It's not as though it will take an exit and head for McDonalds.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    The former possibility can lead to the statement that Voyager 1 is a time capsule for our descendants, rather than a device for communication with intelligent alien species.
    It is far, far, far, far more likely that the "time capsule for our descendants" would apply, should we have descendents that make it out there to catch up with it and have an interest to do so...

    But Voyager 1 can act as a device for communication with an alien species, if that remote possibility: Voyager - The Interstellar Mission

    I am also curious about how we are going to track Voyager 1 in e.g. 100 years from now.
    Are its signals not become weaker due to the vastly increasing distance?
    What will cease Voyager 1's ability to communicate with the Earth will be the failure of its power supply. The supply should last until ~2025, however, due to the decline in power output, it's ability to power the gyroscopes that keep its antenna pointed towards Earth will falter. The antenna will drift and we will lose contact. This is predicted to occur in 2016.
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    The former possibility can lead to the statement that Voyager 1 is a time capsule for our descendants, rather than a device for communication with intelligent alien species.
    It is far, far, far, far more likely that the "time capsule for our descendants" would apply, should we have descendents that make it out there to catch up with it and have an interest to do so...

    But Voyager 1 can act as a device for communication with an alien species, if that remote possibility: Voyager - The Interstellar Mission

    I am also curious about how we are going to track Voyager 1 in e.g. 100 years from now.
    Are its signals not become weaker due to the vastly increasing distance?
    What will cease Voyager 1's ability to communicate with the Earth will be the failure of its power supply. The supply should last until ~2025, however, due to the decline in power output, it's ability to power the gyroscopes that keep its antenna pointed towards Earth will falter. The antenna will drift and we will lose contact. This is predicted to occur in 2016.

    In other words, it is possible that we will hear the signals from Voyager 1 for the last time in 2016?
    After all, we are not sure if we ever catch up with this space craft.
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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  19. #18  
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    A thousand years from now it may be probable to travel in space with greater speeds.Somehow we would overtake Voyager and learn about it.
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  20. #19  
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    it is unlikely we will ever "go after" voyager. unless there is some reason for us to go in that direction. we won't learn anything from it.
    Sometimes it is better not knowing than having an answer that may be wrong.
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  21. #20  
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    It's an amazing feat of engineering. I have some questions;

    How is it that the electronics have lasted so well? Does anybody know what form they take - IC's or discrete components?

    How is it that the gyros and the bearings have also lasted so well - when the vastly more modern gyros fitted to Hubble don't seem to last more than a few years before they need replacing????

    What is the power source and how does it work?

    OB
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    Quote Originally Posted by One beer View Post
    How is it that the electronics have lasted so well? Does anybody know what form they take - IC's or discrete components?
    I know, right... We can't even get simple cars to do it in the relatively mild environment of Earth.
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by One beer View Post
    It's an amazing feat of engineering. I have some questions;

    How is it that the electronics have lasted so well? Does anybody know what form they take - IC's or discrete components?

    How is it that the gyros and the bearings have also lasted so well - when the vastly more modern gyros fitted to Hubble don't seem to last more than a few years before they need replacing????

    What is the power source and how does it work?

    OB

    Good questions!

    I found something about its power source on NASA's page about Voyager:
    "Electrical power is supplied by three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). The current power levels are about 315 watts for each spacecraft. As the electrical power decreases, power loads on the spacecraft must be turned off in order to avoid having demand exceed supply. As loads are turned off, some spacecraft capabilities are eliminated."
    (cf. Voyager - The Interstellar Mission)
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by One beer View Post
    It's an amazing feat of engineering. I have some questions;

    How is it that the electronics have lasted so well? Does anybody know what form they take - IC's or discrete components?

    How is it that the gyros and the bearings have also lasted so well - when the vastly more modern gyros fitted to Hubble don't seem to last more than a few years before they need replacing????

    What is the power source and how does it work?

    OB
    great question!!!

    I'd be interested also!
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  25. #24  
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by One beer View Post
    It's an amazing feat of engineering. I have some questions;

    How is it that the electronics have lasted so well? Does anybody know what form they take - IC's or discrete components?

    How is it that the gyros and the bearings have also lasted so well - when the vastly more modern gyros fitted to Hubble don't seem to last more than a few years before they need replacing????

    What is the power source and how does it work?

    OB
    great question!!!

    I'd be interested also!
    Well i know it uses a Radioisotope thermoelectric Generator, just rolls off the tongue right; and guess this would generate just enough heat to keep the components warm enough to continue to operate. Not sure though, 36 years in space is a long time. Can't even get my dvd player to last 3 years back here on earth......
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  26. #25  
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkey View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by One beer View Post
    It's an amazing feat of engineering. I have some questions;

    How is it that the electronics have lasted so well? Does anybody know what form they take - IC's or discrete components?

    How is it that the gyros and the bearings have also lasted so well - when the vastly more modern gyros fitted to Hubble don't seem to last more than a few years before they need replacing????

    What is the power source and how does it work?

    OB
    great question!!!

    I'd be interested also!
    Well i know it uses a Radioisotope thermoelectric Generator, just rolls off the tongue right; and guess this would generate just enough heat to keep the components warm enough to continue to operate. Not sure though, 36 years in space is a long time. Can't even get my dvd player to last 3 years back here on earth......
    or my computer!!!

    Mahalo for the response.
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  27. #26  
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    I hope Captain Janeway has enough food for the rest of her voyage.
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