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Thread: Hubble Sees the Fireball from a "Kilonova"

  1. #1 Hubble Sees the Fireball from a "Kilonova" 
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
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    NASA is making this report and it's the first time I ever heard of a Kilonova. But then how often do binary neutron stars merge?

    Hubble Sees the Fireball from a "Kilonova" - NASA Science


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    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
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    Never even heard of the term, but of course, my knowledge is very limited compared to a lot of people here. It happened 4 billion light years away though, crazy to think it occurred around the time the Earth was formed and we're just now observing it (well, 2 months ago, but what's 2 months in a 4 billion year time scale?).


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    I think they've only recently coined the term.
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    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    I think they've only recently coined the term.
    That could be, I wonder if there's an easy way to find out?
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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Something about the collision of neutron stars gave me goosebumps.
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    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    I think they've only recently coined the term.
    That could be, I wonder if there's an easy way to find out?
    Well, googling it turned up this forum and the article... that's about it. No Wikipedia page on "KiloNova."
    There is a Wictionary entry on it that is self explanatory. No references.
    kilonova - Wiktionary
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    Forum Bachelors Degree PetTastic's Avatar
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    In the photos, the two comparison photos June 13, July 3, have the vis/uv layer in different positions over the IR.
    If you flick between them, most of the difference in the images is due to this, including what the arrow is pointing to?
    Kilonova Photos: Hubble Space Telescope's Images of Cosmic Explosion | Space.com
    The remnant its self should only be 1 or 2 pixels, but doing a graphic diff does not show much where the arrow points after you subtract the UV.

    Maybe the publicity people just picked the pics with the biggest difference to show.
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    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetTastic View Post
    In the photos, the two comparison photos June 13, July 3, have the vis/uv layer in different positions over the IR.
    If you flick between them, most of the difference in the images is due to this, including what the arrow is pointing to?
    Kilonova Photos: Hubble Space Telescope's Images of Cosmic Explosion | Space.com
    The remnant its self should only be 1 or 2 pixels, but doing a graphic diff does not show much where the arrow points after you subtract the UV.

    Maybe the publicity people just picked the pics with the biggest difference to show.
    The trouble with neutron stars is they can only exist in a fairly narrow mass range. Not quite enough mass and they would be a white dwarf and a little bit to much mass and they collapse into a black hole. Two neutrons stars merging would put them over the mass limit and they would collapse into a Black hole every single time without much doubt.

    So the remnant you are talking about is a black hole.
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    Forum Bachelors Degree PetTastic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by PetTastic View Post
    In the photos, the two comparison photos June 13, July 3, have the vis/uv layer in different positions over the IR.
    If you flick between them, most of the difference in the images is due to this, including what the arrow is pointing to?
    Kilonova Photos: Hubble Space Telescope's Images of Cosmic Explosion | Space.com
    The remnant its self should only be 1 or 2 pixels, but doing a graphic diff does not show much where the arrow points after you subtract the UV.

    Maybe the publicity people just picked the pics with the biggest difference to show.
    The trouble with neutron stars is they can only exist in a fairly narrow mass range. Not quite enough mass and they would be a white dwarf and a little bit to much mass and they collapse into a black hole. Two neutrons stars merging would put them over the mass limit and they would collapse into a Black hole every single time without much doubt.

    So the remnant you are talking about is a black hole.
    In the text they are refering to a disk of radio active material emiting IR.
    That is the remnant I am refering to, as in supernova remnant Supernova remnant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I believe in nothing, but trust gravity to hold me down and the electromagnetic force to stop me falling through
    Physics is the search for the best model not the truth, as only mythical beings know that.
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