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Thread: Basic Question

  1. #1 Basic Question 
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    I am still confused and sorry for these basic questions:
    (1) If the sun is not moving, are all things within the sun's gravitational pull will eventually get suck into the sun? All i know is that gravity and momentum keep the distance in placement. I do not know how much the other planet's gravity affect the Earth in regard with the sun's gravitational pull. Can you tell me?
    (2) Is convection (for magnetism) is present on gas and not just in liquid, right? The the "in and out" (attract and repel) of all magnetic field of star or planet is on its north and south pole, right? Or it has some difference (http://zebu.uoregon.edu/~imamura/122...rcycle_B.jpg)? Is it right to assume that if there's a rotation there's a magnetic field?
    (3) Is a plane flat? If so, then our universe plane gets its curvature if there's a present object/mass in the specific spot?
    (4) Sorry for this more-chemistry-like question but why do they have these atomic Hydrogen and molecular Hydrogen? Am i right to assume that the other element in the chemical table were all first started from the hydrogen via chemical reaction (like Hydrogen>Helium and so on)? If its the first in the table then where does the Hydrogen came from or how it is originated/formed in space?


    Last edited by xingha; March 18th, 2013 at 12:17 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    (1) If the sun is not moving, are all things within the sun's gravitational pull will eventually get suck into the sun? All i know is that gravity and momentum keep the distance in placement. I do not know how much the other planet's gravity affect the Earth in regard with the sun's gravitational pull. Can you tell me?
    The Sun is moving; our solar system is moving along with it.
    The time scales for when all the objects in our solar system would attract into the Sun exceed the lifetime of the star. It will die out long before that happens.
    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    (2) Is convection (for magnetism) is present on gas and not just in liquid, right? The the "in and out" (attract and repel) of all magnetic field of star or planet is on its north and south pole, right? Or it has some difference (http://zebu.uoregon.edu/~imamura/122...rcycle_B.jpg)? Is it right to assume that if there's a rotation there's a magnetic field?
    Magnetic fields can resemble fluid dynamics. But rotation alone is not what is needed to create a magnetic field.
    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    (3) Is a plane flat? If so, then our universe plane gets its curvature if there's a present object/mass in the specific spot?
    A plane is flat. Currently, mainstream theory is leaning toward Flat Space.
    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    (4) Sorry for this more-chemistry-like question but why do they have these atomic Hydrogen and molecular Hydrogen? Am i right to assume that the other element in the chemical table were all first started from the hydrogen via chemical reaction (like Hydrogen>Helium and so on)? If its the first in the table then where does the Hydrogen came from or how it is originated/formed in space?
    Nuclear fusion, not chemistry, in this case.
    Hydrogen is a fundamental atom, upon which the rest of the elements can be fused to create higher elements. I cannot answer how hydrogen originated... In fact most of the "answers" I have offered are pretty basic. I just don't like seeing questions wait too long for any kind of a response.


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  4. #3  
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    "The Sun is moving; our solar system is moving along with it.
    The time scales for when all the objects in our solar system would attract into the Sun exceed the lifetime of the star. It will die out long before that happens."

    I know the sun is moving (orbit and rotate) and galaxy moves as well. But what i want to know is
    if the sun is not moving, are all things within the sun's gravitational pull will eventually get suck into the sun?

    "A plane is flat. Currently, mainstream theory is leaning toward Flat Space."

    I'm really can't believe it either to think of the flat space (theory speaks). It would be easier if the leading theory for space is towarding for a plane with different dimension (for the sake of the term, im not pertaining to other dimension, but rather pertaining to 1d, 2d, 3d, 4d, 5d so on). It would be more flexible for my ears.

    "
    Nuclear fusion, not chemistry, in this case."

    Ah, well, for a noob like me, i consider nuclear fusion as chemical reaction just for the sake of having a general term in mind.
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    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    I know the sun is moving (orbit and rotate) and galaxy moves as well. But what i want to know is if the sun is not moving, are all things within the sun's gravitational pull will eventually get suck into the sun?
    The answer to this is the same as the one I offered.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    I know the sun is moving (orbit and rotate) and galaxy moves as well. But what i want to know is [/COLOR][COLOR=#333333]if the sun is not moving, are all things within the sun's gravitational pull will eventually get suck into the sun?
    The sun's motion is irrelevant to the orbit of the planets. It is the motion of the planets around the sun that stops them falling into the sun. In fact, you can think of an orbit as continually falling - but the sideways motion means the planet stays in orbit.

    The other planets don't have much effect on the Earth either. The sun makes up about 99% of the mass of the universe solar system.

    Ah, well, for a noob like me, i consider nuclear fusion as chemical reaction just for the sake of having a general term in mind.
    There is an important difference: chemical reaction only involve the (outer) electrons of atoms, whereas nuclear reactions involve the nucleus.

    Hydrogen was formed when the universe was cooled after the big bang. At some point it was cool enough for protons and neutrons to form an then for these to form atoms. About 74% of the universe was hydrogen and 26% helium. That is still roughly true today, the other elements (formed in stars) make up less then 2% of the universe.
    Last edited by Strange; March 18th, 2013 at 06:55 AM. Reason: oops
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    The sun makes up about 99% of the mass of the universe.
    Accurate but blasting. This is classic right here... can I steal this from you some day?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    The sun makes up about 99% of the mass of the universe.
    Accurate but blasting. This is classic right here... can I steal this from you some day?
    Doh!

    I would have liked to correct it silently but you have preserved it for posterity. Thank you so much!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    I would have liked to correct it silently but you have preserved it for posterity. Thank you so much!
    Ahhh... it needs no correction. From our perspective, it is accurate enough. At these distances, to us, the Sun IS the only other mass in the Universe to address the question that was asked. Jupiter is negligible and the mass of the Milky Way- taken for granted.
    Because the question focused on how other gravitational influences interact with the Earths orbit, it can help reduce confusion by pointing out a simple perspective.

    Needless to say, the Sun is not the majority of mass in the Universe, but like a '68 gt Shelby - sometimes there just is nothing else.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    The sun makes up about 99% of the mass of the universe.
    Accurate but blasting. This is classic right here... can I steal this from you some day?
    Doh!

    I would have liked to correct it silently but you have preserved it for posterity. Thank you so much!
    Scientifically inaccurate, but philosophically very clever. See? There's always a way out.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Ahhh... it needs no correction. From our perspective, it is accurate enough. At these distances, to us, the Sun IS the only other mass in the Universe to address the question that was asked.
    Err, yes of course. That is what I meant. <cough>
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Err, yes of course. That is what I meant. <cough>
    I had thought that was exactly how you meant it when I read it. If you had just played it off the first time around...
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    I had thought that was exactly how you meant it when I read it. If you had just played it off the first time around...
    It's a really good way of looking at it. Don't be too surprised if I use it in future ... as if I thought of it myself.

    (Although I might have to work out what the gravitational effect of the galaxy is first...)
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    "The sun's motion is irrelevant to the orbit of the planets. It is the motion of the planets around the sun that stops them falling into the sun. In fact, you can think of an orbit as continually falling - but the sideways motion means the planet stays in orbit."

    The sun has gravity, right? Then, the gravity pulls anything under its influence toward to where it sourced, right? Im only thinking that if the sun is not moving and it (the sun's gravity) pulls the nearby objects (planets, etc), then is it eventually suck those objects toward it, no? If not, can you tell me how does the thing work?
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    It's the motion of the orbiting body, actually, that will have a stronger bearing on whether the body collides with the Sun. Try using an orbit simulator to see what I mean.
    You can try this simplistic but sorta fun one, here:
    Planet simulation game | Planet Simulation - Free game site DAN-BALL
    Warning: Java may ask for permission to run
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    The sun has gravity, right? Then, the gravity pulls anything under its influence toward to where it sourced, right?
    Everything that has mass has gravity. The positions and movements of objects within the solar system is all about gravitational relationships.

    The moon has enough mass that its gravity can affect the ocean waters on the surface of the earth, but not move or dislodge the earth itself from its orbit. The sun has much more gravitational force by dint of its larger mass, and that's what keeps the earth in orbit rather than flying away into the galactic nowhere.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Thanks! I actually found an info about my "orbit gravity" question in the google: The Earth Doesn't Actually Orbit The Sun?

    I guess i have it the wrong way. Pls see if comprehension is right... the orbit movement of the solar objects (sun, planets, etc) doesn't cause by the gravity of the sun. Their movement was first caused by other factor maybe the one during the formation of solar system or galaxy formation (lol?). Then the gravity of each other just make them keep close and have a regular orbit, right? And the momentum caused by the movement from the formation of will soon to expire and just continued by the momentum caused by the gravity, right? If the gravity that continued the momentum is not present then these objects will begin to have random movement and probably in more or much more slower rate, right?
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  18. #17  
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    Outstanding at taking steps to learn.
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    Hehehe, thanks! Actually, im a freethinker so you can have a grasp of how do i think/analyze the given data or info.

    Lets check if that's only a lucky guess.... so if the sun's gravity is greater (or more precisely, greater enough) than the momentum, then those objects (with momentum is lesser than the gravity) will eventually got sucked into the sun, like what black hole is doing, right?
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    Hehehe, thanks! Actually, im a freethinker so you can have a grasp of how do i think/analyze the given data or info.

    Lets check if that's only a lucky guess.... so if the sun's gravity is greater (or more precisely, greater enough) than the momentum, then those objects (with momentum is lesser than the gravity) will eventually got sucked into the sun, like what black hole is doing, right?
    Or they would have established stable orbits further out....

    You seem to have got it, but here is another explanation to help cement things: Satellite Motion
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by xingha View Post
    I guess i have it the wrong way. Pls see if comprehension is right... the orbit movement of the solar objects (sun, planets, etc) doesn't cause by the gravity of the sun. Their movement was first caused by other factor maybe the one during the formation of solar system or galaxy formation (lol?). Then the gravity of each other just make them keep close and have a regular orbit, right? And the momentum caused by the movement from the formation of will soon to expire and just continued by the momentum caused by the gravity, right? If the gravity that continued the momentum is not present then these objects will begin to have random movement and probably in more or much more slower rate, right?
    Pretty good. The solar system was formed from a cloud of gases and dust. As it collapsed it rotated faster (conservation of angular momentum: spinning ice skater pulls in her arms to go faster). This gave angular momentum (rotational speed) to the planets. This is what keeps them from falling into the sun.

    Apart from a minute amount of resistance from the not-quite vacuum of space and the effects of tides, this angular momentum won't change.

    Note that the moon is slowly moving away from the earth due to tidal effects.
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