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Thread: astronomy

  1. #1 astronomy 
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    1)why the release of Gravitations(strength of the gravity increses) get increse when object strart to get small

    2)i read in one artical that speed of graviton 20% of speed of light,even though it is equal to C how it escapes from blockhole


    or it just warping the spacetime, i just wanna know why it warps so heavily when it gets small, even though it has the same mass(what is the special with that r(radius) or it simply because the formala is like that )


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  3. #2 Re: astronomy 
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    Quote Originally Posted by maheshesw
    1)why the release of Gravitations(strength of the gravity increses) get increse when object strart to get small

    2)i read in one artical that speed of graviton 20% of speed of light,even though it is equal to C how it escapes from blockhole


    or it just warping the spacetime, i just wanna know why it warps so heavily when it gets small, even though it has the same mass(what is the special with that r(radius) or it simply because the formala is like that )
    I suspect many will be confused by your question, if you could cite an example, [written by somebody else] or possibly rephrase your question in a sort of 'modern science' fashion someone will, I am sure try to answer it.


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  4. #3 Re: astronomy 
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Hi maheshesw, welcome to the forum.

    Like billco I found your questions a little difficult to follow. I think the following may partially answer them. If not, could you restate them please.
    You seem to be asking a question about neutron stars or black holes. In other words, about very massive objects composed of degenerate matter, such that a great deal of mass is concentrated in a very small space. I think you are asking why the surface gravity on these bodies is so high. After all, if it were practical to stand on an imaginary surface of the object when it was in the form of a much larger star, then the gravitational attraction would be comparatively low.

    The gravitational attraction between two bodies is given by the following equation:

    gravitational attraction = mass1 * mass2 * k/distance^2

    (Where k is a constant)

    The distance is the distance between the centres of mass of the two bodies. For a large star the distance from the centre to the surface is large and so that distance squared is very large, and the resultant gravitational attraction is small. As the object gets smaller, while retaining the same mass, then the distance squared becomes smaller quite rapidly. If the distance is half then the gravitational attraction will be four times greater, for example.
    So when the distance is very small the gravitational attraction becomes extreme.

    Hope this helps.[/code]
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