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Thread: The Moon closest to planet earth yesterday? Sunday/Monday 6th/7th May, 2012.

  1. #1 The Moon closest to planet earth yesterday? Sunday/Monday 6th/7th May, 2012. 
    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    My daily Newspaper ran a snippet concerning the close approach of the moon. Haven't seen or heard another mention, high tides etc. Could anyone out there throw some moonlight on this? Perigree? westwind.


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    We have had several days of minor coastal flooding here, fortunately it was not accompanied by a nor'easter.


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    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    Thanks MeteorWayne for posteing. No, we had no further interest in the configuration of our Earthly experiences with our lovely moon. Not even some Advertising Opportunities to sell products on the back of the close Moon. I think their is a message here. Our Citizens in Melbourne obviously walk around with their heads down and go to bed when the Sun goes down. But seriously, how often would this situation occur? Close Moon I mean? And where are we in our Orbitual Path around the Sun? In the Elliptic path of our Orbit are we nearest the sun at the moment or are we out on our furtherest distance? I am interested in this because Gravitational Forces would be maximised if we are at our closest approach to our Sun and the closest approach to our Moon all at the same time? My guess is that we are approaching our furtherest distance from our Sun, otherwise Tidal inflence would have been greater. Forgive clumsy presentation of this Poste, I am more comfortable in Economic Forums. westwind.
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    There is one closest full moon of the year every year, one closest one of the decade every decade, one closest of the century every century, one closest of the millenium every millenium, etc...

    The tides were most likely the highest in 1400 years from 796 to 2257 AD on Jan 3, 1912, about 4 months before the Titanic sank. It is suspected that the super tide refloated grounded icebergs, one of which could have been the one they hit.

    This was due to a confluence of 3 factors:

    Earth Perihelion Jan 3 10:44 (UTC)

    Full Moon Jan 4 13:29

    Lunar Perigee Jan 4 13:35

    What the earth at perihelion does mostly (since the direct gravitational effects are small) is it makes the lunar perigee particularly close, 356,375 km, vs 363,000 km for a typical perigee.

    The tidal force was 74% greater than that of the moon at it's mean distance from the sun (which is ~ 384,400 km).
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    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    Gazed at the Moon today. It's a few days since the full Moon. Saw the Moon in a different light. ( daylight ). Really think I saw it for the first time for what it is. Here is this companion of our Planet keeping us company, just out there, influencing our oceans, probably our Atmosphere as well, circling us--looking at us!! Now. One Question. Ancient peoples didn't care much for our Moon. They seem to have been more interested in Sirius, or Mars, or the Constellation this or that. But our Moon is right there. What's more fascinating then that? Why did Navigation by the Stare take priority over Navigation by our Moon.? I see our Moon playing a bigger part in the future of our Planet. It wouldn't take much of a shift in Orbit to attract the Moon back closer to the Earth. Then we should see some Tidal movement. westwind.
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    Because the moon moves so far against the sky every day. It rises 30-50 minutes later every day. Over a voyage of months at sea, it is much more difficult to use as a navigation aide. it moves about 12 degrees a day. Wheras the stars only shift position by about 1 degree a day rising about 4 minutes earlier.
    And for those north of the equator we have a built in compass in the sky, a dim beacon, but a beacon nonetheless... Polaris. It's always (within a degree) at the same spot in the sky, due north. Day or night, winter summer spring or fall, day or night. And it's easy to find, with two bright constellations pointing right at it.
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    Moon being closest to the earth recently it is definitely the influence of tidal waves.It captured the inquisitiveness as well as imagination of people all around the world.Still we have to go
    beyond moon, in the world of understanding how our galaxies came into existence and are expanding from each other.I hope our scientists would try their level best in this regard.
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    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    For MeteorWayne. Polaris. Yes. Throughout Modern History Northern Europeans have obtained their Bearings from this Star. What I cannot understand for the life of me is how come it is a fixed position to Northern Hemisphere situations?. Our Southern Cross is only accurate for a few weeks during the year. ( Indicating the South Pole that is ). Then it wanders almost over head, or to the East, then disappears below the Horizon. You probablt observe the Southern Cross stars low on your
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    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    Western horizon.( this is a continuation from poste 8 ). As I was about to continue MeteorWayne, it baffles me to think that Polaris stays in a fixed position in relation to Northern Hemisphere Observers. Earth inclination or orbit positioning is irrelevant? There has to be complicated Mathematics at work here. It is as if Polaris had Earth on a String attached to an anchor point in the North Atlantic.? Keep it simple MeteorWayne, my head gets heavier and my brain starts to solidify if I haven;t had enough milk. westwind.
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    Quote Originally Posted by westwind View Post
    For MeteorWayne. Polaris. Yes. Throughout Modern History Northern Europeans have obtained their Bearings from this Star. What I cannot understand for the life of me is how come it is a fixed position to Northern Hemisphere situations?. Our Southern Cross is only accurate for a few weeks during the year. ( Indicating the South Pole that is ). Then it wanders almost over head, or to the East, then disappears below the Horizon. You probablt observe the Southern Cross stars low on your
    Because the polar axis of the earth currently points directly (well, again, within about a degree) at it.

    Ever see a properly mounted globe? (aligned 23 1/2 degrees from vertical) Spin the globe. The north pole always points at Polaris.
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    It is amazing to know that oceans are influenced by gravitational effects of Moon.Indeed nature has given us so much for surprise and understanding.The physical laws of gravitation that ranges from such effects of Moon on tidal waves to effects of Sun on our entire solar system are really something to wonder and think about.
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