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Thread: how they do this:stereoscopic galaxy

  1. #1 how they do this:stereoscopic galaxy 
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    also i was wondering if theres going on some synchronicity and that galaxy is this galaxy:



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  3. #2  
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    I think they do it with the earth's orbit around the sun, as it's a huge orbit, thus can sort out the minute difference. Some objects will ofcause have moved in that time between photo-shoots, as you highlight in the other picture.


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  4. #3  
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    There's no way stereoscopic pic is useful here... a galaxy is like insanely far far away from us, they'll just look flat...
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  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    I agree, this must be artificial. Remember the definition of a parsec as a distance unit. One parsec is the distance at which radius of the orbit of the Earth subtends an angle of 1".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsec

    I doubt that such an angle is sufficient to produce such an effect that is visible to the naked eye. Resolved galaxies are typically more than 1 million times farther away.
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  6. #5  
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    I agree with HexHammer that these images were probably captured at opposite positions in Earth's orbit, like a huge stereo camera, to simulate human binocular vision.

    I tried reducing the image's size on my screen, but my screen resolution is woefully inadequate to produce a decent stereoscopic image.

    Then I did the unthinkable:
    1. copied/pasted the stereoscopic image into MS Paint,
    2. cropped the black space around it,
    3. reduced image size to 28% (creating a difference between images of 62 mm, the typical distance between adult pupils),
    4. inverted colors (to save on toner and to produce more accurate stars),
    5. printed it, and
    6. viewed it close up under adequate lighting
    I found that the galaxy and its two neighboring "dust bunnies" appear in the foreground compared to the flat backdrop of stars, and I think I can see depth within the galaxy itself, but maybe it's just my imagination.

    The photo is about 1350 pixels wide and 410 pixels tall.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    I agree with HexHammer that these images were probably captured at opposite positions in Earth's orbit, like a huge <u><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereo_camera" target="_blank">stereo camera</a></u>, to simulate human binocular vision.
    This is very unlikely, because the two images that produce the stereoscopic impression are nearly identical and even contain the same diffraction artefacts around the brighter stars. This is almost impossible for two real observations taken two different times.<br><br>You can create the stereo impression also on the screen by controlled squinting until both images overlay. If you do this, you see that the foreground stars are only a 2D sheet in front of the galaxies. However, the 3D impression should be even stronger for those stars and reveal different distances.<br><br>I think, this is computer generated in a similar way like for lenticular prints. See also:

    Calculating Stereo Pairs

    If you follow the link mentioned in the image, you get to:
    M31 - Andromeda Galaxy and it's satellites

    Here, it is clearly stated that those are simulated 3D images.
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  8. #7  
    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
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    The images are not identical. If you look at approximately the nine oclock position, there is a small bright star, which on the left hand image appears outside the halo, and on the right hand image appears well inside. It would seem a slightly different angle produced the two images.
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  9. #8  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Okay, let me put it this way: they have been calculated from the same image. Of course, the stars shift their positions in order to produce the impression of depth.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    I found that the galaxy and its two neighboring "dust bunnies" appear in the foreground compared to the flat backdrop of stars,
    The stars should be in the foreground if anything. It's a computer generated image.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster View Post
    the foreground stars are only a 2D sheet in front of the galaxies
    I analyzed portion of both the background and foreground at the pixel level, and I found both to be different from their counterparts. That is, the backgrounds are not the same, and the foreground objects are not the same between the two images. I conclude that that these two images are bona fide stereoscopic images. I can't say whether any foreground objects would have enough depth to appear stereoscopic, which is a function of depth vs distance.
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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  12. #11  
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    The picture has 2 watermarks, "fpsoftlab.com/gallery" one above each galaxy. The site offers screensavers. This would lead me to believe that it was photoshopped from one image.
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