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Thread: how are there mountains in the middle of impact craters on the moon

  1. #1 how are there mountains in the middle of impact craters on the moon 
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    Are they dormant volcanos? Thanks. Filix.


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    It is because the moon surface became (molten) liquid upon impact. The 'mountain' was an example of a 'rebound' you would see if something fall into a calm water (you need to observe thoroughly, maybe find a video in youtube), the reason the 'rebound' stayed still and not flatten like in real water is because the surface quickly (frozen) solidify into rock, so it stayed that way. It always happen that when an object collide fast enough it release a very very high heat... in case of impact on moon it is like a nuclear bomb exploding...


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    delete incomplete post
    Last edited by MeteorWayne; January 30th, 2012 at 08:10 PM. Reason: Delete incomplete post
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    It's actually nothing like a nuclear bomb exploding, though the rest is correct.

    See Complex crater - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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  6. #5  
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    Thankyou both. Vert interesting link. I would like to see one hit. I wonder when the last good size impact was. Filix.
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    Of more interest is when the next one will happen
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  8. #7  
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    True! In the 4.5 billion years the moon has been around, that's plenty of time to get wacked. Especially with no atmosphere to stop them. I wonder how many large impact craters the moon has. Say lager than meteor crater in Arizona.
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    Quote Originally Posted by filix View Post
    True! In the 4.5 billion years the moon has been around, that's plenty of time to get wacked. Especially with no atmosphere to stop them. I wonder how many large impact craters the moon has. Say lager than meteor crater in Arizona.
    Hundreds of thousands, I would think. Have you ever tried to count the craters you can see on the moon? One estimate is there are ~ 300,000 craters larger than a half mile in diameter.
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    Supposedly most happened during one of the "bombardment" periods early in the history of the Solar System, but I defer to MW on all such questions. Obviously such collisions are still possible, as Shoemaker-Levy 9 demonstrated.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=shoe...iw=800&bih=511
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    In general that is correct. The vast majority occurred early in the solar system history, when there was a lot more leftover material around, and the Giant planets were moving around stirring the pot. Obviously such things have occurred "recently" as the ~49,000 year old meteor crater demonstrates. However, a crater the size of Meteor Crater, would not have been visible on the moon until the space age when orbiting craft were able to take close up images with sufficient resolution (about 45 years ago). Since then there haven't been any searches for fresh ones that I can recall, but it's an interesting question. I shall investigate. Somebody must have done some kind of a search. (he hopes)
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    I never thought of that. I quess one could not see meteor crater if you were standing on the moon. If a good size one hit on the side that faces us, would we see a flash? Would there be a dust cloud around the moon? Shoemaker-Levy comet. I will never forget that. It was the coolest thing I ever saw. I was living in florida. I could see it so good with my binoculars. I watched it every night. What a show! Filix.
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  13. #12  
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    Eros would make quite a splash!
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    Quote Originally Posted by filix View Post
    I never thought of that. I quess one could not see meteor crater if you were standing on the moon. If a good size one hit on the side that faces us, would we see a flash? Would there be a dust cloud around the moon? Shoemaker-Levy comet. I will never forget that. It was the coolest thing I ever saw. I was living in florida. I could see it so good with my binoculars. I watched it every night. What a show! Filix.
    A number of flashes have been observed during major meteor showers. During them, when the dark side of the moon faces the incoming meteoroids dozens of amateur and professional astronomers monitor the surface. So far, size unknown, and AFAIK, no new crater has been discovered at those locations, but the search goes on.

    The next campaign would probably have occured during the eta-Aquariid shower in early May, but especially in the northern hemisphere, it's only visible for an hour or two before sunrise, and this year it's a full moon, so the whole side facing us is lit. I've only seen 15 ETAs in 33 hours over the last 6 years, it's a challenge. It's one of two showers caused by the debris from Halley's comet.

    So probably it will have to wait until the Perseids in August. (Comet Swift-Tuttle)
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    Coincidentally, 433 Eros made it's closest approach to earth today since 1978, about 70 times the distance to the moon.
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    Soo cool! Shoemaker-levy isn't just 1 asteroid, but a dozenss of them. Who have thought a column of asteroid hit a same target multiple time, even hollywood haven't thought of that, it must be super-devastating... :0
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    Quote Originally Posted by msafwan View Post
    Soo cool! Shoemaker-levy isn't just 1 asteroid, but a dozenss of them. Who have thought a column of asteroid hit a same target multiple time, even hollywood haven't thought of that, it must be super-devastating... :0
    Actually, they were comets, not asteroids...
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    Quote Originally Posted by msafwan View Post
    Soo cool! Shoemaker-levy isn't just 1 asteroid, but a dozenss of them. Who have thought a column of asteroid hit a same target multiple time, even hollywood haven't thought of that, it must be super-devastating... :0
    I think it was a single body which broke apart due to tidal stresses imposed by the gravity field of Jupiter.
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    That's correct. It was orginally one comet and was disrupted on a previous close pass by Jupiter by tidal forces.
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