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Thread: Question here!

  1. #1 Question here! 
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    Hello all, i am new, and i see this forum is made out of alot of thinktanks...
    I was going thru the NASA page today and i saw they are testing new engines, well they arent new, since they have similar fuel make-up then their predecessors. So i know about vasimr engines and i was wondering why arent they attaching those one and testing them?
    Why dont they make a test drone or a satellite with those engines and test them real-time... I read that they are far more fuel efficient then this solid fuel rockets.

    Thats bothering me for quite some time, we have technology waiting to be launched, why not use it?

    Thanks for reply!

    SD

    Edit: Sorry for language mistakes.


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  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    The last I heard, they plan on sending one to the ISS in 2014 for testing.


    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  4. #3  
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    Zubrin Claims VASIMR is a Hoax

    This approach is not without its critics, it would seem, dotcomrades.
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it.- Thucydides
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  5. #4  
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    Ignore Finger Prince.

    VASIMR will be tested soon somewhere in space, probably on the ISS. It does not have enough power to launch anything from the earth's surface; much like the ion engines on the Dawn spacecraft now orbiting Vesta, once in space it can provide very low levels of thrust for very long periods of time using little propellant.

    So far it has only been tested in vacuum chambers on earth, so is a good theoretical concept.

    Hopefully it will be tested soon, but like any new technology, there are bugs to be worked out before it's worth spending the millions of dollars to put in in space for actual testing.
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  6. #5  
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    First thanks for your answers guys.
    I laugh to those who say its a hoax, type AD-Astra in Google and see first hand results from initial ground testing.
    Janus i heard that one too, but maybe you know if it will be realized due to budget,transportation problems?
    I agree with bugs and errors wayne but if it works they'll have a brand new technology for deep space usage. This is my ace for future propulsion and i hope they will get it done! But still i think are few glitches with human behind the whell, whati mean is, they need to test how our bodies will take this speeds. You never know maybe some part of army branch took it to some black project location and they are already using it, but hey we can only guess.

    Thanks again!
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  7. #6  
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    I have heard they are going to launch soon.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mentor View Post
    I have heard they are going to launch soon.
    If by soon you mean 2014 (from Ad Astra itself) then, yes.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne View Post
    Ignore Finger Prince.

    VASIMR will be tested soon somewhere in space, probably on the ISS. It does not have enough power to launch anything from the earth's surface; much like the ion engines on the Dawn spacecraft now orbiting Vesta, once in space it can provide very low levels of thrust for very long periods of time using little propellant.

    So far it has only been tested in vacuum chambers on earth, so is a good theoretical concept.

    Hopefully it will be tested soon, but like any new technology, there are bugs to be worked out before it's worth spending the millions of dollars to put in in space for actual testing.
    Beg pardon, dotcomrade, but Prince is simply observing that not all are confident of VASIMR viability. You mean, "Ignore Zubrin."

    As for resolution of the matter, time alone will tell. If "low levels of thrust for very long periods of time using little propellant" is desired, why not use solar sails?

    Much more simpler.

    Would you care to elaborate response to Zubrin's objections?
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it.- Thucydides
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  10. #9  
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    A viable interstellar craft would most likely have several propulsion systems, just as the first trans oceanic craft had both oars and sails. Solar sails and some sort of low energy, low fuel use, long term reaction engine make sense. Solar sails get less effective away from the sun.
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