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Thread: Big Bang Theory and Lifecycle

  1. #1 Big Bang Theory and Lifecycle 
    Forum Freshman openminded's Avatar
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    Interested in what you experts think on the subject. Something that popped into my mind was this:

    Imagine a huge doughnut, this doughnut consists of empty space and stands upright. At the bottom (Southern portion) of the doughnut is an area with extreme gravity.

    Over time this area of extreme gravity accumulates all the matter that we call space (Planets, Stars, Dust, etc) and compresses it to the point it begins to split atoms. Obviously causing explosions. There could be a number of smaller explosions and reformations until the mass and density of this gravitational
    area became so big. A huge explosion would eventually occur, the Big Bang, sending debris flying in both directions NE and NW up the doughnut north bound.

    Over billions of years the debris begins slowing down as it reaches the top of the doughnut (North). As the debris pass this northern part of the doughnut it slowly increases speed because of the Southern area's gravitational pull. Until once more it is gathered and compressed in the Southern portions gravitational area.

    If my theory is correct, like any life cycle, the Big Bang would be a recurring and renewing event. Adding the entertaining thought: How many times has this already occurred? Amoung the many others..

    I heard a scientists say there was nothing before the Bang, but the little scientist in
    me questions that thought.

    This Theory seems possible logically(its mine by the way or maybe someone thought of it already)...Is this possible (math wise)? Equations anyone?


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  3. #2 Re: Big Bang Theory and Lifecycle 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by openminded
    Interested in what you experts think on the subject. Something that popped into my mind was this:

    Imagine a huge doughnut, this doughnut consists of empty space and stands upright. At the bottom (Southern portion) of the doughnut is an area with extreme gravity.

    Over time this area of extreme gravity accumulates all the matter that we call space (Planets, Stars, Dust, etc) and compresses it to the point it begins to split atoms. Obviously causing explosions. There could be a number of smaller explosions and reformations until the mass and density of this gravitational
    area became so big. A huge explosion would eventually occur, the Big Bang, sending debris flying in both directions NE and NW up the doughnut north bound.

    Over billions of years the debris begins slowing down as it reaches the top of the doughnut (North). As the debris pass this northern part of the doughnut it slowly increases speed because of the Southern area's gravitational pull. Until once more it is gathered and compressed in the Southern portions gravitational area.

    If my theory is correct, like any life cycle, the Big Bang would be a recurring and renewing event. Adding the entertaining thought: How many times has this already occurred? Amoung the many others..

    I heard a scientists say there was nothing before the Bang, but the little scientist in
    me questions that thought.

    This Theory seems possible logically(its mine by the way or maybe someone thought of it already)...Is this possible (math wise)? Equations anyone?
    Don't give up your day job.

    This violates ALL observational data and is at odds with ALl accepted theory.

    Moreover it is up to you to "provide the equations", not someone else to make sense of your gibberish, translate it into mathematics and point out all of the fallacies.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman openminded's Avatar
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    Well glad you didn't hold back

    You're speaking of the observational data that assumed the universe was expanding slower over time I presume?

    So it is assumed the 'evolved from a dense, isothermal state' (CMB) was it? Nothing before it or how it became doesn't sound, very sound.

    Considering everything else has a life cycle it doesn't require a big reach to assume the Bang doesn't.
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  5. #4  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by openminded
    Well glad you didn't hold back

    You're speaking of the observational data that assumed the universe was expanding slower over time I presume?

    So it is assumed the 'evolved from a dense, isothermal state' (CMB) was it? Nothing before it or how it became doesn't sound, very sound.

    Considering everything else has a life cycle it doesn't require a big reach to assume the Bang doesn't.
    nope

    You presume wrongly.

    The observational data suggests that the rate of expansion is increasing, not slowing down.

    Thatn supports a moidel based on general relativity with a positive cosmological constant. That model predicts a big bang.

    The theory is quite sound, whether it seems that way to you or not.

    Don't give up the day job. Better learn some physics.
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  6. #5 Re: Big Bang Theory and Lifecycle 
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by openminded
    Over billions of years the debris begins slowing down as it reaches the top of the doughnut (North). As the debris pass this northern part of the doughnut it slowly increases speed because of the Southern area's gravitational pull. Until once more it is gathered and compressed in the Southern portions gravitational area
    This idea again repeats the assumption that the "Big Bang" was an "explosion" of something into an already existing universe with space available to expand into. As has been stated in numerous other threads on this topic, this is not correct. It is space itself that expands and drags the matter with it. If this were not the case, one would have to explain the problem of apparent superluminal velocities of distant galaxies.

    Another problem with this idea is that the universe has a boundary. All evidence we have gathered so far contradicts this view.
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  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by openminded
    So it is assumed the 'evolved from a dense, isothermal state' (CMB) was it?.
    This seems to be a quote from a not so scientific TV series, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by openminded
    Considering everything else has a life cycle it doesn't require a big reach to assume the Bang doesn't.
    Reasoning by analogies is something that was popular in science centuries ago. Now that we can gather evidence, this tool should be used with caution. Analogies can be very misleading, because they are mainly produced by human imagination which has proven to be flawed.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman openminded's Avatar
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    Thank you for the helpful response Dish Master

    'apparent superluminal velocities of distant galaxies.' ! Small(big) detail that slipped my mind...knew I was missing something.

    As far as the TV series, no, that particular quote was from a University (I think U WA). In the future I'll make sure I cite it.

    Looking forward to release of the data from Planck observatory regarding their observations of the microwave background at higher resolution than WMAP.

    Think I'll do a lot more studying on the subject, and glad I asked...
    (what does a systems engineer/researcher know, its easier in my profession to find answers <grin>)

    Thanks again DM.
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  9. #8  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by openminded
    Looking forward to release of the data from Planck observatory regarding their observations of the microwave background at higher resolution than WMAP.
    Stay informed about the progress here:
    http://www.rssd.esa.int/index.php?project=planck
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