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Thread: Singularity Behaviors

  1. #1 Singularity Behaviors 
    Forum Freshman 6nqpnw's Avatar
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    Was re-reading 'A Brief History of Time' the other night and came across this ::: "Two black holes collide to create an event horizon greater than the sum of the areas of the originals." There are no attempts to explain this phenomenon throughout the reading; though I believe there may be an explanation that doesn't violate today's precious 'empirical observations.'

    Suppose the merging of two or more black holes is NOT a true merging. Rather than presuming singularities collide with one another, perhaps they dance around in orbits that prevent them from becoming a single entity. If so, these orbits would occupy an area larger than if condensed into a single point; consequently, the event horizon would appear greater than the sum of the originals.

    Though I have no observational data to support this claim [cuz my blackholescope is down for maintenance ::: <nyuck> <nyuck>], there was a video documentary on Discovery hosted by Morgan Freeman that showed a computer model for the projected paths of two colliding black holes [begin reading @ 14m 03s]. The results were that of non-decaying orbits in a cloverleaf pattern: precisely the same behavior as an electron with a proton (hydrogen, if u will). Here's a few more black hole orbits that resemble electron clouds / atomic orbits.

    Hopefully some of y'all will participate in discussion as I have add'l questions that build off of this but I don't wanna hit ya with it all at once.

    And please, let's presume these findings/claims have already underwent the processes of validity and credibility...please. You're a good group of guys and gals, so rather than argue, let's discuss .


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    The radius of a black hole is proportional to its mass. Merge two black holes together and the radius is the sum of the radii. Therefore area of the merger is greater than sum of the original areas.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mathman
    The radius of a black hole is proportional to its mass. Merge two black holes together and the radius is the sum of the radii. Therefore area of the merger is greater than sum of the original areas.
    You might be right but it doesn't make sense. Why would a black hole loose density with increased mass?
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    Forum Freshman 6nqpnw's Avatar
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    You might be right but it doesn't make sense.
    I'm not gettin' it either. My understanding is ... let's say ... an event horizon the size of a basketball collides with another the size of 2 basketballs, then the resulting horizon would be the size of 3 basketballs ::: r1 + r2 = r3. Hawking states that essentially r3 > r1 + r2 and claims entropy (2nd Law of Thermodynamics) explains this. I'm suggesting it's caused by orbiting singularities.

    Also, I'm please that noone's busting my chops about the validity of non-decaying orbits of singularities, but I'm providing a couple more findings to support this behavior.

    Energy Level Diagrams for Black Hole Orbits
    Zoom-Whirl Orbits in Black Hole Binaries
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman 6nqpnw's Avatar
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    HEY OH WHOA whoa whoa <screeching brakes> !!!

    While fumbling through the aforementioned papers, I realize that I have fallen prey to misinterpretation. They're not showing orbits of singularities (internal to the event horizon), but rather orbits of black holes (external to the event horizons).

    There's nothing to see here folks ... keep moving! It's just a dead thread; get over it!
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    Quote Originally Posted by mathman
    The radius of a black hole is proportional to its mass. Merge two black holes together and the radius is the sum of the radii. Therefore area of the merger is greater than sum of the original areas.
    You might be right but it doesn't make sense. Why would a black hole loose density with increased mass?
    Whether or not it agrees with intuition, that's the way it is. It is not a question of density, but what the radius is, for the given mass, so the escape velocity is equal to the speed of light.
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