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Thread: M theory and Dark Matter

  1. #1 M theory and Dark Matter 
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    Snort and Bluff said:

    call me spectularly uninformed; apart from reading science fiction and watching pop science documentaries, but if you accept one of the explainations of the weekness of gravity (namely that gravitons are not bound to the membrane that our universe exists on )

    and accept also that our membrane exist in close proximity to many other membranes in the bulk

    doent this not suggest an explaination for the nature of dark matter?

    isnt it suggestable that the mapping of dark matter and its lensing effect on light, and its reinforcing effects the spin of a galaxy can all be explained by the reciprocal effects of neighbouring membranes with their own topology of galaxy sized clusters of mass which just like membrane bleed gravitons across the bulk to interact with our membrane?

    the 'mapping' of dark matter then become a map not of the density of DM in our universe but the influx of gravitons resulting from a combination of the topology of mass in nearby membranes and also the proximity of said membranes to ours.
    i have had the same thoughts, but i thought that gravity permeated through the 11 dimensions also predicted by string theory, not between the membranes (i believe they are two entirely different things?). My limited understanding (and it is very limited) of the theory is that all membranes exist in the "11th dimension" and that the multiverse consists of membranes floating around in this 11th dimension.

    If i am wrong or WAY off the mark, then please let me know, i am here to learn!

    Also, i understand that the theory predict that two or maybe more of these branes crashed into each other and the ripples on the surface of the branes colliding at different times created matter.

    If this is correct (and i know it is only a theory), then would it be possible within the confines of the theory, that the very same branes that collided could go onto cause the inflationary period of the early universe (which i believe is well established). My thoughts are that after the membranes had collided, they moved apart again and the expanding universe "caught a ride" if you like. After a time the early universe lost its grip of the membranes and the inflation period ended.

    like i said before, i have a very limited understanding, so please be gentle in your mocking of my ignorance


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  3. #2  
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    Gravitons have yet to be conclusively proven much like dark matter, and these branes were constructed as a model to account for information retrieval in singularities such as black holes...so I'm not sure whether the model is entire true to life (its athematical model is correct it that it gives a reason why information is not lost from inside the event horizon, but its true nature is not yet understood).


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    It has been suggested that photons could have mass. It would be below 10^-35 of a kg but it would explain many things, like how a gravity source can bend the path of photons passing it. It would also mean that every gravitational source in a galaxy except those in direction of travel could be dragging at it, so redshifting it (since it cannot lose speed, it loses energy).

    Since it would be indistinguishable from recessional redshift, such an additional redshift of photons would be greater than recession alone but would make things look as though they were moving faster than they were, as in stars moving around a galaxy. If they were indeed moving slower, there is no need for dark matter to prevent them being hurled out of a galaxy.
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  5. #4  
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    It has been suggested that photons could have mass.
    Whose suggestion? It would require a major overhaul of current physics if photons had a non-zero rest mass. For example, you could slow them down.
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