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Thread: The Locomotor Heaven - a theory adaptation

  1. #1 The Locomotor Heaven - a theory adaptation 
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    hi there...

    i just want to know your insights about this Locomotor Heaven stuff - it's one of our paperworks for our physics.. i dunno if such theory exist but this one just came out from ideas of our group....

    it's about the universe - a finite universe it has its own limits yet it is not expanding nor contracting.. the universe itself is not expanding or contracting it is just that the heavenly bodies in it are the ones moving in it yet it still can not exceed the limit

    If ever it will reach that finite limit, since heavenly bodies are moving then they'll just move again after it hit that...

    the theory of black hole could also support the limits... since a supermassive could be in the center of the universe then the force it exerts should have a limit where it could gravity force could act..

    still what beyond it is another topic.. what we have in mind is beyond that finite limit is nothing..

    so what do you guys think?


    hi there.. i'm a student.. hope you'd help me in understanding things.. thanks alot!
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  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    If I understand your question correctly, I think that there are many facts that show that such a hypothesis cannot work. If the universe does not expand, it would be difficult to explain the large redshifts of distant objects as their individual velocities. This would automatically put us in the centre of the universe, because the relative velocities of any object would increase depending on its distance from us, just like we observe an increasing redshift, the farther the objects are. Such an unlikely configuration is avoided when employing a cosmological redshift caused by expansion. Another contradiction is that redshifts > 1 have been observed that would - if explained as a simple Doppler shift - allow for superluminous speeds. This is of course impossible.

    What would be the force that causes the individual velocities in such a picture? It would be either a repelling force acting from some centre, or it would be an attractive force pulling from outside the universe. But what would that be? The latter possibility would be a paradox, because it contradicts the definition of the boundary of the universe.

    So, if you want to uphold this hypothesis, you would have to explain redshifts other than based on Doppler shift, i.e. individual velocities.

    Another question is, what would happen if an object hits the boundary of the confined universe.

    Gravity has an infinite range. It does not stop at a certain distance. And what role would a hypothetical black hole play in this picture? On large distances, it does not make any difference, if it is a black hole that produces the gravity or any other massive object like a galaxy cluster.


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    Forum Freshman 6nqpnw's Avatar
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    Whoa whoa whoa ... hold on ... gravity has an infinite range?! Doesn't it decay with distance? Or is it the tidal forces that decay with distance?

    Hmm ... never thought of it this way before, but similar to light decay, does gravity take other forms? This is crazy interesting ::: off to the world wide interweb i go...

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  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6nqpnw
    Whoa whoa whoa ... hold on ... gravity has an infinite range?!
    Yes, but it never drops to zero. In the Newtonian approximation, it is obvious that it drops proportionally with the square of the distance of objects. But it never reaches zero.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman 6nqpnw's Avatar
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    so a real number (or any number for that matter) can never be proportionally divided to zero point?

    [gulp] I have a feeling that you're gonna tear me a new one regarding a recent post.

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