Notices
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Which direction does the sun face in the galaxy?

  1. #1 Which direction does the sun face in the galaxy? 
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    Say for instance the Earth rotates around the sun, Which direction does the Earth look in the galaxy? Is it rotating around the sun more the milky way's thickest part (lets say the y) or closer to the longest part (x)?


    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2 Re: Which direction does the sun face in the galaxy? 
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime
    Say for instance the Earth rotates around the sun, Which direction does the Earth look in the galaxy? Is it rotating around the sun more the milky way's thickest part (lets say the y) or closer to the longest part (x)?
    Huh? I guess the "facing" part got me.

    I you're asking where are we in the Milky Way, I found the graphic below on the web site: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/sub...em/where.shtml





    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,075
    If you mean how the plane of the solar system is aligned with respect to the disc of the Milky way it is like this:

    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


    Edit/Delete Message
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    As you can see from Janus' graph above, we see the sun projected towards the galactic plane for short periods twice a year. But during its daily rotation, any part of the Earth faces the galactic plane for some time. We just do not always see it, because it may happen during the day.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Geo
    Geo is offline
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    273
    On a clear night you can see a distinct band of stars. You can only see c.5700? stars with the naked eye. Is this the Galactic Plane?

    Why is our Galaxy called the Milky Way, it's not exactly romantic!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo
    On a clear night you can see a distinct band of stars. You can only see c.5700? stars with the naked eye. Is this the Galactic Plane?

    Why is our Galaxy called the Milky Way, it's not exactly romantic!
    Yes, this is the Galactic Plane, i.e. what we see of the Milky Way. The name stems from ancient Greek mythology: "Galactos" means milk, i.e. the Galaxy in the sense of ancient mythology literally means "a band of milk".
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Geo
    Geo is offline
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo
    On a clear night you can see a distinct band of stars. You can only see c.5700? stars with the naked eye. Is this the Galactic Plane?

    Why is our Galaxy called the Milky Way, it's not exactly romantic!
    Yes, this is the Galactic Plane, i.e. what we see of the Milky Way. The name stems from ancient Greek mythology: "Galactos" means milk, i.e. the Galaxy in the sense of ancient mythology literally means "a band of milk".
    I guess milk means breast and mammal etc, so it is romantic.

    What is the relationship between distance from the centre and star properties?.

    How old is the Milky Way, where did our Solar System form?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,075
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo

    I guess milk means breast and mammal etc, so it is romantic.
    The name wasn't meant to be romantic, but descriptive. In Greek mythology it is caused when Hera finds Hercules suckling at her breast and pushes him away. The result is that her milk is strewn across the heavens.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


    Edit/Delete Message
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo

    I guess milk means breast and mammal etc, so it is romantic.
    The name wasn't meant to be romantic, but descriptive. In Greek mythology it is caused when Hera finds Hercules suckling at her breast and pushes him away. The result is that her milk is strewn across the heavens.
    Or both. The Greeks were not certainly not immune to romantic notions :-)
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo
    How old is the Milky Way, where did our Solar System form?
    The oldest star is thought to be around 13.2 billion years, so the galaxy is almost as old as the universe. Keep in mind it has a complex history and has grown through the acquisition of smaller galaxies.

    The solar system formed in part of a collapsing Giant Molecular Cloud, positioned about the same distance from the centre as we are now. Since we complete an orbit of the galaxy every 200 million years or so it is rather meaningless to ask 'where' was the solar system formed: we've made more than twenty orbits since then.


    What is the relationship between distance from the centre and star properties?
    Population II stars, the older stars, are IIRC concentrated in the galactic bulge at the centre of the Milky Way.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •