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Thread: Rain in the star

  1. #1 Rain in the star 
    sak
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    Can there be some kind of rain in a star?


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  3. #2 Re: Rain in the star 
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sak
    Can there be some kind of rain in a star?
    It depends, what you mean by this. It is generally said that the Helium nulei that are produced by the fusion process rain down onto the solar core. In that sense, you could speak of "rain". But the Helium is not in a liquid state, but consists only of plasma, i.e. a hot gas of ions.


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  4. #3  
    sak
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    Like some metal evaporate, form a cloud then rain down!!! (I refer to the atmospheric temp. on earth is between freezing and boiling point of water.)
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  5. #4  
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    The Sun is sufficiently hot that elements cannot form. However all the ingredients are there and it is possible that a distance from the surface of the Sun, simple elements may form only to fall back into the Sun. With a cooler star, such a rain of elements could be common.

    Material from huge solar prominences falls back to the Sun in varying degrees of intensity.
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  6. #5 Re: Rain in the star 
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    Quote Originally Posted by sak
    Can there be some kind of rain in a star?
    To take your question literally, YES, but this rain would be coming FROM the stars during their eruptions.
    These eruptions are explosions in the normal sense as oxides break down from the impacting bodies to cause the explosions that result in the creation of WATER.

    So all the water we see in the universe come from the stars.

    Cosmo
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  7. #6  
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    The Sun is sufficiently hot that elements cannot form.
    The surface is only around 6000K, cool enough for elemental atoms to exist. In fact, a spectral analysis of the sun does show more than just Helium and Hydrogen.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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