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Thread: Moon Pic's

  1. #1 Moon Pic's 
    Forum Freshman IrishStu's Avatar
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    I took these two pic's on the 14th of Jan at about 11:00pm. I used an Olympus E-500 D-SLR with a 45mm lens looking down the eye piece of my Meade ETX-60 telescope. The first pic is a little off center because I moved a little when I took it. It's also dimmer b/c I had an ISO400 film setting on the camera.
    The second shot came out just right (although a little off center again). Used an ISO of 400 this time and a shutter speed of 1/10. I also had to mirror the images in Paintshop Pro to accout for my telescopes eye piece.

    Enjoy!!!






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  3. #2  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Excellent. If I finally succumb, this year, to a lifelong intention of purchasing an astronomical telescope it will have been in part because your photos have pushed me in that direction.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman IrishStu's Avatar
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    Also took these long exposures of Cassiopeia and Orion (note the fuzzy M42 patch and all the light polution).


    Cassiopeia.


    Orion.

    More pic's real soon (as soon as I get a clear night...)!
    Enjoy Lads and Ladies!
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  5. #4 Wow... 
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    Very nice pics Stu! Looking forward to seeing the ones on a clear night. The sky must be beautiful in Ireland Way too many lights in my area of the world

    Wendy
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  6. #5  
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    welcome fellow irish man!
    so far as i know, i was the only one(unlsee they were annoymos)

    nice pictures. i find it hard ot get a clear night! so much cloud!

    and at the moment my telascope is in my room under the bed,
    but sweet,

    just curious, if you live in a city or town?
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman IrishStu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodgod3rd
    just curious, if you live in a city or town?
    I'm in a city. And yes I agree, the weather in Ireland is a bit on the unpredictable side. This is why I always keep my telescope set up and ready to go at all times. When I took the moon pic's I had about 2 minutes of clear time around the moon before the next band of cloud came rolling in .
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  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D.
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    exactly, ilive in the country, so the light dosent affect me, but one problem i live in a vally, sorta, so theres two sides always blocked by tow huge hills.

    also i don't really have an enthusiam enough for it!

    keep on posting :-D
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman John L's Avatar
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    Two questions.

    1. Are you "hand holding" the camera?

    2. Why are you using ISO 400?
    We must all hang together or assuredly we will all hang seperately. -Benjamin Franklin

    http://ai-jane.org/bb/index.php
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  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman IrishStu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John L
    Two questions.

    1. Are you "hand holding" the camera?

    2. Why are you using ISO 400?
    Holding for the Moon shots, Tripod for the star shots. I used 400 because, as you can see above, the first moon pic was too dim for my liking on ISO 100. So I switched up to a ISO 400 for more light sensitivity and a better result (if I do say so myself). I could have let the shutter open a bit longer but as I was holding the camera, looking down the eye piece of my telescope, I did not want motion blur so I up'ed the ISO. The star shots were taken with ISO 100 because the long exposures with ISO 400 (or higher) generated alot of noise (my camera is digital). So I found a compromise and there it is.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman John L's Avatar
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    I've never tried to take any shots through a telescope before. But I have done done some difficult things, and with the right tripod, it is possible to set up the camera to just about everything.

    I have a digital camera that I use for casual shots, but still use my film cameras for detailed things. But I never use anything faster than 100 ISO. If speed is needed, I use a flash to accompany it.

    But I think that if you went with the slowest speed possible and strung out the shutter speed, you would get the best picture possible.

    I once took a noon shot with a longer lense and a 50 ISO at F22 for about 45 seconds, if I recall correctly. The picture came out so sharp and detailed that I could have blown it up into a poster size, had I wished. All with a 35mm camera.

    I used to be a big fan of the fast lense, but since going to slow film speed, I never use it anymore. The extra cost for a lense like that is not justified, I believe.
    We must all hang together or assuredly we will all hang seperately. -Benjamin Franklin

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  12. #11  
    Forum Freshman IrishStu's Avatar
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    I know what your saying but I did try to set up on the tripod looking down the telescope eye piece but the moon was moving so fast in the FOV it was gone from view by the time I got the chance to take the pick. That's why I decided to hold it. Plus being a cloudy night I was under pressure to take it.
    Some night when the sky is completely clear I'll set up properly and position the telescope so that the moon passes through the FOV, allowing me ample time to set up on the tripod properly.
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  13. #12  
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    on the second pic, what is that circle thing on the moon. it looks like an if it were an axis or something.
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  14. #13  
    Forum Freshman IrishStu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .:azurite:.
    on the second pic, what is that circle thing on the moon. it looks like an if it were an axis or something.
    You gotta be more specific azurite... There are many cirlces on the moon (not being funny).
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  15. #14  
    Forum Freshman Professor Marvel's Avatar
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    azurite,

    Since you don’t seem to be getting any other action on your question I will offer this: I suspect that what you are referring to is the crater Tycho. Tycho is the center of a bright splash pattern caused by the impact of an asteroid. This system of “rays” often misleads people into thinking that it somehow marks the south pole of the Moon; it does not. Personally, I always thought that it made the Full Moon look like a peeled orange.

    (I added a label to the original image but can't seem to get it uploaded properly so here is the URL.) If this isn’t what you meant …. I hope that you enjoyed the story anyway.


    http://www.zone-vx.com/tycho
    “I thought about the consequences, but then I figured … What the hell !!”
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  16. #15  
    New Member Dan Luna's Avatar
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    Nice photos. Getting the whole Moon in always looks good. 8)

    According to lunar scientist Charles Wood in his recent book The Modern Moon, the dark circle around Tycho crater is impact melt thrown out from the crater. Tycho is one of the newest large craters and has not yet had the melt smashed up and lightened by more recent small impacts.
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