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Thread: Today's universe

  1. #1 Today's universe 
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    Observing the universe and distant galaxies of 14b light years in the past, what is our universe today? Would observing the current universe, if possible, reveal the mysteries of it?


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  3. #2 Re: Today's universe 
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajg624
    Observing the universe and distant galaxies of 14b light years in the past, what is our universe today? Would observing the current universe, if possible, reveal the mysteries of it?
    The only mysteries that exist today are in the heads of the BBTheorists like Dark Matter, size of the BB, current driving force for the expansion of space, initial conditions that started the expansion (one scientist mentions super gravity as the stater) and there could be other such problems.

    Cosmo


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    The only theory at present is the big bang and that has many serious problems with it to the point that it is probably wrong. It is possible that the universe is steady state and of uncertain age.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyberia
    The only theory at present is the big bang and that has many serious problems with it to the point that it is probably wrong. It is possible that the universe is steady state and of uncertain age.
    Steady state cannot work for many reasons! That has been confirmed already decades ago. It also has been reshaped so many times. Originally, it was invented to overcome problems with the age of the universe derived from the initial Hubble constant that was much too high. After discovering the reason for this (cepheides of two kinds), the problem could be avoided. Steady State needs production of matter out of nothing (first from open space => refuted, then from nuclei of active galaxies => refuted) which always would result in radiation that has never been found. It also contradicts with the conservation of energy. Steady State has much more and more severe problems that Big Bang.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyberia
    The only theory at present is the big bang and that has many serious problems with it to the point that it is probably wrong. It is possible that the universe is steady state and of uncertain age.
    Steady state cannot work for many reasons! That has been confirmed already decades ago. It also has been reshaped so many times. Originally, it was invented to overcome problems with the age of the universe derived from the initial Hubble constant that was much too high. After discovering the reason for this (cepheides of two kinds), the problem could be avoided. Steady State needs production of matter out of nothing (first from open space => refuted, then from nuclei of active galaxies => refuted) which always would result in radiation that has never been found. It also contradicts with the conservation of energy. Steady State has much more and more severe problems that Big Bang.
    My 'Flat Space' universe is completely compatible with the Laws of Conservation of Matter and Energy. It is a SSU but I chose to use the FS concept because Hoyle et al accepted the expansion of space as a reality. So their introduction of new matter to maintain a uniform density was a mistake.

    The BBT is a creation out of nothing (time zero) that violates the Law of Conservation of Matter.
    The Arp Redshift Anomaly refutes the 'expanson of space' as the cosmological redshift and my article 'Mathematical Proof' confirms Arps Anomaly to be right.

    There are many other reasons that refute the BBT.

    Cosmo
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    You guys haven't argued this enough on the other thread? Why do you need to hijack this one with a very clear question that you have all ignored?

    He asked if looking at our present universe would shed some light on anything. One of you said(i will paraphrase) "There is nothing to shed light on" and then continued to explain things that needed some illumination. The rest of you just took it from there to ignore the point and start arguing the VERY SAME point that you have a whole other thread to argue on.

    I don't have anything to offer but I am curious too what our galaxy looks like from the outside. It is said to look like the Andromeda galaxy, why I do not know, but the Andromeda galaxy is the closest one, so if ours is so similar to it, one could use it as a reference to compare new and old galaxies maybe.
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  8. #7 Re: Today's universe 
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajg624
    Observing the universe and distant galaxies of 14b light years in the past, what is our universe today? Would observing the current universe, if possible, reveal the mysteries of it?
    I doubt that. Quite contrary: To be able to look into the past at large distances is a big advantage, because we can test theories much better in this way. If we understand the history of the universe, we also understand the current situation of the universe much better.

    It seems that the relevant processes last long enough that we can use the "contemporary" near universe to study the present. Furthermore, we do not expect any difference to the local environment anywhere else in the universe.
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    Todays universe is an example of structures in various states of composition from gaseous galaxies to spiral to elliptical. So these variations indicate that evolution is right here in our vicinity and not necassarily in or of the universe.

    The youngest like the Magellanic Coulds in the southern hemisphere to the spirals and then the oldest like the ellipticals are examples of evolution.

    Besides, the HDFields North, South and Ultra prove that our universe is much larger than you would expect as a BB.
    I calculated that the HDFN is about 25-30 billion light years deep.
    So this is twice the distance of what a BB universe would be.
    And to top if off, we did NOT see the end or the edge of this universe.
    The extra large space telescopes in the very near future will see about 4 times deeper and I predict that we will still not see the edge of this universe.

    Cosmo
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    Dishmaster. The only real problems with a steady state universe can be overcome if black holes have a maximum size. They have a sphere of fundamental particles inside them. This would spin at the maximum possible speed for matter (virtually light speed) but the problem is that with a sphere, parts of it spin at different speed (ie: circumference and poles) so it will gradually be forced out of shape as it gets ever larger, as it all tries to spin at the same speed. I think it would have to end up as a doughnut shape in a very large black hole. The gravity goes where the mass is and it is possible that if the doughnut is big enough, there may be insufficient matter at the centre to maintain an escape velocity exceeding light speed, so that fundamental particles can escape from the poles of the event horizon.
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