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Thread: Moon Question

  1. #1 Moon Question 
    New Member foetaige's Avatar
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    I'm not too big on astrology but for my line of work, it's becoming a bigger factor. You see I am a amatuer photographer, a night amatuer photographer to be more exact, and moonlight plays a huge role in my line of work. I tend to go out more the week the moon goes from, excuse me if I get this wrong, Gibbious Waxing -> Full Moon -> Gibbious Wanning since that is when I get the most moonlight.

    Well to my point. I live in Los Angeles California and was wondering what path the moon takes during the winter. I heard a lot of stuff like, "Summer, the moon goes from south to west and in Winter from north to west." So... the moon rises in either the north or south and always sets in the west? In the month of October, I really want to shoot the moon right over the pacific and with some little research I was able to find out all this stuff:



    Code:
    Apparent geocentric position
    Right ascension     2h 0m 48s
    Declination    14° 10' 23"
    Range    373,225 km
    Constellation    Aries
    
    Appearance
    Diameter    32.02'
    Illumination of disk    99%
    Libration in longitude     5.022°
    Libration in latitude    -2.288°
    
    Topocentric Event    Time      Altitude
    Sets:   07:09   +0.1°
    Rises:   18:25   +0.1°
    Maximum altitude:   00:29   65.1°
    This being already set for my location in Los Angeles and on October 17th when the next full moon strikes. What I want to know is, will it be rising or setting in the ocean and at what time will it be just above the horizon.

    I'm not asking for you to give me a straight answer, but if you do, thank you very much, but more on how I can find out. Are their any equations that I can plug some of that info into to find out the path, rising and setting times? Thank you for your time.

    -Cesar


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  3. #2  
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    Hi Foetaige. I do not know if this is helpful or not, but my copy of StarDate Magazine says the following:

    October 17: Hunter's Moon this morning. During early morning, a slight partial eclipse of the Moon is visible from the western half of North America. Look for a slight dent in the Moon's southeast edge; it's deepest at 7:03 a.m. CDT.

    October 18: By the time darkness falls, the Moon is rising low in the east-northeast. A half hour after moonrise, Mars rises below it. They cross the sky together for the rest of the night. Mars is now very bright, magnitude
    -2 --- brighter than any star in the night sky --- as it nears its close pass by Earth less than two weeks from now.

    October 19: Mars shines to the right of the Moon after they rise in mid-evening.

    October 25: Saturn shines to the lower right of the Moon before and during dawn.

    October 26: The Moon is at apogee.

    October 29: Mars is closest to Earth tonight, 43 million miles (69 million km) away. It's nearly as close and bright for a couple of weeks before and after. In a telescope, Mars appears 20 arcseconds wide, which is unusually large.

    October 30: Daylight Savings Time ends at 2:00 a.m. for most of North America. Clocks "fall back" an hour.


    I hope this is helpful. StarDate Magazine is published by the McDonald Observatory in Texas. If you make a donation to the observatory, the magazine is free along with some perks to the observatory. I did want to see Mars, but I severely damaged my telescope (which I really do not want to go into as to how this happened) One thing I noticed pertaining to the moon, right before hurricane Rita hit Texas and Louisiana, the moon was blood red. I have only ever seen it white, yellow, and orange, so this was an amazing sight to behold even if it was almost ominous as the hurricane was approaching! LOL

    Cyndi


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  4. #3  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    This being already set for my location in Los Angeles and on October 17th when the next full moon strikes. What I want to know is, will it be rising or setting in the ocean and at what time will it be just above the horizon.
    Just go out the night before and watch to see when it rises that way you will know.
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  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    There are a number of software programs that calculate the stellar, planetary and lunar positions from anywhere on the planet for any time in last (or the next) few thousand years. The sophisiticated ones (Dark Skies[?] springs to mind) are quite expensive, but there are simple ones - that would meet your needs - for around $15.
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope mitchellmckain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    There are a number of software programs that calculate the stellar, planetary and lunar positions from anywhere on the planet for any time in last (or the next) few thousand years. The sophisiticated ones (Dark Skies[?] springs to mind) are quite expensive, but there are simple ones - that would meet your needs - for around $15.
    Why bother? (Sorry Ophiolite, no offense I hope.) With access to the internet there are free websites that will do this for you.

    One which I use a lot is
    http://www.stargazing.net/mas/moon.htm
    For a lot more like this
    http://www.stargazing.net/mas/sheets.htm
    See my physics of spaceflight simulator at http://www.relspace.astahost.com

    I now have a blog too: http://astahost.blogspot.com/
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  7. #6  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    foetaige.....

    By the way, you stated "I'm not too big on astrology but for my line of work, it's becoming a bigger factor." Well astromomy is more in the line of what your discussing here not the Zodiak!
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  8. #7  
    Forum Sophomore NimaRahnemoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foetaige
    "Summer, the moon goes from south to west and in Winter from north to west."
    The moon has nothing to do with the seasons.

    Following the lunar calendar, i think this is how it is... at a new moon the moon come up in the east, and settles in the west. At a half moon (i forgot the name)... the moon comes from the east, travels to the middle of the sky, and settles back in the east.

    I think it may depend on where you live. This info might be false... I took astronomy two years ago
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  9. #8  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    [quote="mitchellmckain"]
    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Why bother? (Sorry Ophiolite, no offense I hope.) With access to the internet there are free websites that will do this for you.
    I have driven out into the country to get away from the city lights. While I am photographing the moon I begin to notice some of the other stars. What are they? No problem. Fire up the lap top and run my software. No internet required.
    We are now so internet reliant that my colleagues often go home when their is a system crash. Let's have a little bit of Ludditism.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Junior Cuete's Avatar
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    This simulation software is free:

    Celestia: http://www.shatters.net/celestia/

    I've never used it, but you should give it a try
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  11. #10  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope mitchellmckain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuete
    This simulation software is free:

    Celestia: http://www.shatters.net/celestia/

    I've never used it, but you should give it a try
    I do use Celestia and constantly compare it to my own simulator, since it is an OpenGL simulator like my own. But being a simulator like my program it not the easiest way of getting the information you are after.

    The controls are awkward (it is more difficult to move around I think) and the stars not very realistic (all being identical except for color) but its database of stars is far larger and it has many types of objects that my program does not like comets and spacecraft. But then, it is easy to add more stars (or other objects) to my program from lists on the internet and my program has many objects that Celestia does not (eg star clusters, nebulas, neutron stars, black holes and galaxies). The focus of my program is a bit different, being on relativistic physics, optics and the physics of spaceflight. The scale of my program is larger including many and more realistic galaxies and galactic clusters out to about 60 million light years. Both calculate the current position of the planets and moons, but I would trust Celestia more (I have been debugging this feature of my own program up till fairly recently) and I think you can set the date in Celestia.
    See my physics of spaceflight simulator at http://www.relspace.astahost.com

    I now have a blog too: http://astahost.blogspot.com/
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nima Rahnemoon
    Quote Originally Posted by foetaige
    "Summer, the moon goes from south to west and in Winter from north to west."
    The moon has nothing to do with the seasons.

    Following the lunar calendar, i think this is how it is... at a new moon the moon come up in the east, and settles in the west. At a half moon (i forgot the name)... the moon comes from the east, travels to the middle of the sky, and settles back in the east.

    I think it may depend on where you live. This info might be false... I took astronomy two years ago
    Uh, dudes? Everybody? The moon rises in the East and sets in the West the same as the Sun does, because the rising and setting of the Moon is down to the earth's rotation. The Earth rotates once per day, but the moon takes 29½ days to go around the Earth, so on a single day the moon's motion is not sufficient to affect which direction it rises and sets.

    New moons and half moons (and full moons of course) are solely to do with where the sun is relative to the moon during its orbit of the Earth, so again nothing that actually affects the moon's path through the night sky.

    I'm sorry, but you must have an astonishingly bad memory if you took an astronomy course only two years ago, Nima, and yet were able to come up with such nonsense. I've never taken an astronomy course in my life, but I know a little basic common sense! Something that seems to be lacking on this thread as a whole, it seems to me(!) (Except for Ophiolite, I'm all in favour of a teeny bit of Ludditism myself. Though in my case, if the system crashes, but we still have the Internet, it's the only reason I have for staying! )
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  13. #12  
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    The moon always rises in the east and sets in the west.

    I live on the campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville. The last 2 nights the moon has been beautiful. Nice weather too.

    JIM COLYER
    http://www.jimcolyer.com

    ASTRONOMY
    http://jimcolyer.com/papers/entry?id=2
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  14. #13  
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    Many weather websites and newspapers give the times of the rising of the moon and its setting. Just take a look at those and then watch the moon's course over a few nights, from time to time. It does tend to appear to wander over the sky from east to west, but usually within several degrees of the sun's path. When it intersects the sun during one of these times, it's called an eclipse.

    The moon has nothing to do with the seasons, altho there is the harvest moon, which essentially is called that because it is a full moon which appears close to the autumnal equinox in September. It's merely a convention tho and there is no lunar association with any seasonal changes.
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