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Thread: possibility of new sun formation

  1. #1 possibility of new sun formation 
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    jupiter exceptionally close makeup to that of the sun would it be possible that jupiter could be another sun thats just forming?


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  3. #2 Re: possibility of new sun formation 
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lavender
    jupiter exceptionally close makeup to that of the sun would it be possible that jupiter could be another sun thats just forming?
    At 1/1000 the mass of the Sun, Jupiter only has about 1/75 of the mass needed to form even a small star.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Not enough mass to initiate fusion, but see 2010, the movie/novel by Arthur C. Clarke for a sci-fi way to make it happen.
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  5. #4  
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    thanx very interesting on the same note i wasnt considering now i figured that it didnt have enuf mass i was just wondering if the possibility of it being a future sun was on the table
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  6. #5  
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    it will never become a star but when the solor system was being formed if more mass went to jupitor it would of become a sun and we would go arouond two suns. or some scientist have theorized.
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    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    in order to become a sun the pressure at the centre of a hydrogen body needs to be high enough to ignite hydrogen fusion - jupiter is nowhere near the minimum size to achieve it
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  8. #7  
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    How much pressure is required to maintain (not initiate) a hydrogen fusion reaction anyhow?

    This has been a passing thought of mine for years; Since it's on the table for discussion here, I figure we could run some numbers with someone well versed in the details of atomic fusion...

    Given an initial charge of energy (large massive collision with another planetary body for example), to kick-start a small local reaction somewhere in the metallic hydrogen core, I'm wondering if that would cause a pressure increase just enough to create a chain reaction that would/could cascade atmospheric pressures to critical?

    My guess is that given enough energy, it could start some fusion, maybe not completely sustainable, but could make an interesting, and bright object in the night sky for a few years, eh?
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  9. #8  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    this wiki entry on brown dwarves may go some way towards showing how far jupiter is off the mark for becoming a star : you need at least 75 to 80 times the mass of jupiter to have sustained hydrogen fusion

    i think the reference to deuterium and lithium is there because they form part of the intermediate steps in the reaction 4H => He
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  10. #9  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    i think the reference to deuterium and lithium is there because they form part of the intermediate steps in the reaction 4H => He
    Yes, brown dwarves burn deuterium instead of the commonly abundant normal hydrogen like normal stars do. Smaller core temperatures than needed for normal hydrogen fusion are needed. Even normal stars, before they reach the final stage of stable hydrogen burning, have a short phase of deuterium fusion.
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