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Thread: Books on writing a novel

  1. #1 Books on writing a novel 
    Forum Professor mmatt9876's Avatar
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    Any good kindle books on writing a novel? Particularly how to structure a story and begin, continue, and end strong.


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    Forum Freshman Discere et Docere's Avatar
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    Quite simple, really - just Google books, find it at your library, and see if they are helpful. You'll find things people didn't even mention. Also, I recommend reading the classics, and observing their execution. After all, they say that artists often learn by imitation.


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    Anything by Hemingway
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    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Any good kindle books on writing a novel? Particularly how to structure a story and begin, continue, and end strong.
    Not sure but one of my kin is a writer. This is how she scopes out a story.

    Leave filling out the content till the end. Commence with a large A3 sheet of paper and use a strategic plan as a basis for the story.

    Adopt a theme of your choice which is the basis for the entire story. Have a commencement, multiple stages for the guts of the story and a rivetting conclusion. Plot these headings on the A3 sheet of paper. On this plan, then develop smaller circular themes that are offshoots of the major theme but are stories in themselves. Plot these circular mini themes on the A3 piece of paper in a timeline. Progressively do this until there is a sufficient plan on paper to then flesh the plan out with content without having to create a storyline on the go. Use this approach to avoid mental blocks and also extend story lines across a single book or series of books. Make sure you frequently refer to the main theme so you do not lose the reader and ensure each mini theme is not too disparate from the main theme.

    If you are sufficiently thorough with the plan, then writing the content is an easy step.

    If you adopt this methodology you can ensure continuous writing without blockages and allow writing to start earning you a living through a consistent income.

    Great major themes for fiction are those popular themes of mass market appeal such as witchcraft and other fantasy, crime who-dunnit's, hero/superhero books with much carnage, shameful business practices etc. etc. etc.

    To be different however, please shake it up a bit and also attempt to make the central theme premise original.

    Away you go now and get to work!!!!!!!! Please send your completed novel to me free of charge/ tic....... :-))

    PS There are a lot of free form writers out there however and it beats me how they do it and remain coherence in the storyline. It is probably just practice.
    Last edited by Implicate Order; January 19th, 2014 at 08:56 PM.
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    Forum Professor mmatt9876's Avatar
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    I am thinking about writing a medieval fantasy like Lord of the Rings or World of Warcraft so I think I will start there. Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by Discere et Docere View Post
    Quite simple, really - just Google books, find it at your library, and see if they are helpful. You'll find things people didn't even mention. Also, I recommend reading the classics, and observing their execution. After all, they say that artists often learn by imitation.
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    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    I am thinking about writing a medieval fantasy like Lord of the Rings or World of Warcraft so I think I will start there. Thanks!
    Great idea. I think both Tolkien and Raymond Feist (and probably J.K. Rowling) used this approach in their story-telling. When reading Feist I can see this approach at work. It also gives a basis if you are successful to push the books out by theme extension. If you go professional, once the plan is scoped out, meet with a publisher to discuss whether there is sufficient momentum in the story to allow for several books or not. :-))
    Last edited by Implicate Order; January 20th, 2014 at 05:49 PM.
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    Forum Professor mmatt9876's Avatar
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    So for example my theme could be something like a new kingdom is born. Some offshoot themes could be about how a civil war founded the new kingdom, how the people who founded the new kingdom had to slay a dragon to make the land safe, or how a hero within the new kingdom is destined to become a saint.
    Quote Originally Posted by Implicate Order View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Any good kindle books on writing a novel? Particularly how to structure a story and begin, continue, and end strong.
    Not sure but one of my kin is a writer. This is how she scopes out a story.

    Leave filling out the content till the end. Commence with a large A3 sheet of paper and use a strategic plan as a basis for the story.

    Adopt a theme of your choice which is the basis for the entire story. Have a commencement, multiple stages for the guts of the story and a rivetting conclusion. Plot these headings on the A3 sheet of paper. On this plan, then develop smaller circular themes that are offshoots of the major theme but are stories in themselves. Plot these circular mini themes on the A3 piece of paper in a timeline. Progressively do this until there is a sufficient plan on paper to then flesh the plan out with content without having to create a storyline on the go. Use this approach to avoid mental blocks and also extend story lines across a single book or series of books. Make sure you frequently refer to the main theme so you don not lose the reader and ensure each mini theme is not too disparate from the main theme.

    If you adopt this methodology you can ensure continuous writing without blockages and allow writing to start earning you a living through a consistent income.

    Great major themes for fiction are those popular themes of mass market appeal such as witchcraft and other fantasy, crime who-dunnit's, hero/superhero books with much carnage, shameful business practices etc. etc. etc.

    To be different however, please shake it up a bit and also attempt to make the central theme premise original.

    Away you go now and get to work!!!!!!!! Please send your completed novel to me free of charge/ tic....... :-))
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  9. #8  
    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    So for example my theme could be something like a new kingdom is born. Some offshoot themes could be about how a civil war founded the new kingdom, how the people who founded the new kingdom had to slay a dragon to make the land safe, or how a hero within the new kingdom is destined to become a saint.
    You are on the right track but first ensure the central theme of the kingdom is a story in itself with a beginning, lots of mid points and an end. A kingdom is born sounds like just the beginning. What happens to the kingdom and what is the conclusion?.

    Your central theme needs a beginning, lots of progressive points (to be able to return to after a frolic in a sub theme) and a rivetting conclusion. For example Feist's central narrative in one of his series is a invasion of a 'middle earth type' kingdom by an alien race. The commencement was the introduction to the kingdom and the central characters who would reappear throughout the story line. The next strategic point was the entrance of the alien civilisation, the next was a point of encounter, and so on and so forth but a resolution was reached at the end in a stunning conclusion with a major battle where the reader actually began to appreciate both worldpoints of view. Within this narrative were offshoots or quests around this central narrative that returned to the main story line. :-))

    PS The whole point of this structure is to create momentum for the reader. You want them to burst with anticipation regarding the finale but you want to drag this out without pissing them off so to speak. To be a page turner you can do this with clever sub plots around the central theme that at least gives a sense of closure along their quest. The sub plot avoids them turning to the last page too quickly.....if you get my drift. It is worthwhile spending some time on your central theme. You need a 'blown away' idea that can be used to tease out the story.
    Last edited by Implicate Order; January 19th, 2014 at 08:55 PM.
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